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Arts + Life

Arts + Life

In the video posted to Twitter, Ayrton Little dons Harvard red, the viewer watching him as he peers at his own screen, waiting to see whether he got into his dream school. Everyone seems to sweat. Little's schoolmates crowd around him in anticipation. A big moment to be sure, especially for a 16-year-old. Then a gasp and the room erupts in cheers, screams and embraces.

He did it.

It was Christmas Eve in 1967. William Lynn Weaver, 18 at the time, was walking in Mechanicsville, the neighborhood he grew up in in Knoxville, Tenn., when he saw a boy gliding down the street on a bicycle.

"Boy, that looks like my brother's bike," he mused.

When he got home, he asked his younger brother Wayne where that bicycle was. "It was down on the steps," he replied. But it wasn't.

The Weaver brothers tracked down where the boy lived — an unlit shack in an alley — and planned to confront him.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Frankie Shaw (@frankieshawisag), the executive producer, director, writer and star of “SMILF,” a Showtime comedy about a single mom struggling to raise her son in South Boston.

Interview Highlights

On making a show about a “different South Boston”

California Wildfires: Tell Us Your Story

Dec 8, 2017

Wildfires are burning across a large swath of Southern California, and NPR is working to bring you the latest information. If you have been affected, we would like to hear from you.

Did you have to evacuate? What is happening in your neighborhood? How are these fires affecting your mental and emotional state?

If possible — and if you're in a safe place — we would like to follow your story.

To be honest, I never really understood why so many people saw The Crown as a superior TV show last season.

Yes, the Netflix drama has the production values and ambition of an epic motion picture, tracing the long reign of Queen Elizabeth II. And for those who miss the aristocratic soap opera of Downton Abbey, a big-budget recounting of the royal family's turmoil over marriages and abdications is quite a replacement. Who can argue with 13 Emmy nominations?

Sheryl Connelly has a crazy job. She's in charge of looking into the future for Ford Motor Co. The automaker is trying to predict how people my age — from Generation Z — will use cars.

"I have two Gen Zers at home," Connelly says. "So my 16-year-old daughter is thrilled, actually. Her car is ready to go. As soon as she has her license, it's in the driveway. And so she sits in her car and she listens to the radio and she loves her car."

That's definitely not me.

In France today, nothing else matters. Johnny Hallyday is dead.

The French rock star, who died at 74 of lung cancer at his home outside Paris Wednesday, had a career spanning 57 years. He sold more than 100 million albums, but was little known outside his own country. USA Today once called him "the greatest rock star you never heard of."

Retrospectives and tributes have poured in, and France's Prime Minister Edouard Philippe paid tribute to Hallyday in Parliament.

President Trump’s planned announcement to drastically shrink Bears Ears National Monument is drawing criticism from conservationists and members of five Native American nations located near the site.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Davis Filfred, a Navajo Nation Council delegate and member of the Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition, about why he and others are pushing back on Trump’s plans.

The students entering college are not millennials. The next generation, Generation Z, has arrived. The oldest in the group are in their early 20s.

Not only have they never known a world without the Internet, some have had smartphones since middle school.

And for this group, memes, animated GIFs and emojis are second nature, says Geoff Nunberg, a linguist who does features on language on NPR's Fresh Air.

The recent cultural reckoning over sexual assault and harassment has highlighted the dangers women face in workplaces throughout Hollywood, media organizations and in public office. The growing number of accusations has put a spotlight on high-profile men's abuse of power, many times with white men being accused by white women. But what about stories from women of color?

Karen Attiah, The Washington Post's global opinions editor, tells NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro the current conversation surrounding sexual harassment largely excludes women of color who are victims.

Christopher Harris was diagnosed with AIDS in the 1980s. At the time, there was only one drug approved for treatment, and the diagnosis often meant a death sentence.

For Christopher, it led him to become an early member of the Atlanta Buyers Club, which distributed unapproved drugs to treat AIDS patients.

The diagnosis came not long after he began seeing Jim.

"He was so good looking," Christopher tells StoryCorps. "It was the first time that I had fallen in love, and we were together until the day he died."

How TV Executives Scramble When Stars Fall

Dec 2, 2017

The list of Hollywood stars accused of sexual misconduct continues to grow, and TV networks and streaming services are pulling the plug on projects tied to people with allegations against them.

But what’s next for the shows determined to move forward without central characters? Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson and NPR TV critic Eric Deggans (@Deggans) discuss.

Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore and comedian Jimmy Kimmel had a heated exchange on Twitter after Moore accused Kimmel of mocking “Christian values.” Also, a controversial article by The New York Times about a Nazi sympathizer has some readers offended.

What Are Your Regrets Of 2017?

Dec 2, 2017

Updated on Dec. 8, 2017

NPR's All Things Considered wants to hear from you. Another year is coming to a close and we want to know: what did you do that you regret?

Your responses may be used in an upcoming story, on air or on NPR.org. A producer may reach out to you to follow up on your response, too.

This form was closed on Dec. 8, 2017.

Archaeologists recently unearthed a curious artifact in California: An Egyptian sphinx.

Unlike the Great Sphinx of Giza, which was made of bedrock, this sphinx was made from plaster. And it wasn't carved by the ancient Egyptians, but molded by designers on the set of Cecil B. DeMille's 1923 biblical film The Ten Commandments.

Ricardo Liniers Siri, known professionally as Liniers, holds a unique position in the broad swath of Latin American culture.

The new documentary “Meth Storm” shows how a potent form of meth and a lack of economic opportunity are devastating a rural Arkansas community. The film premieres Monday night on HBO.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with filmmakers Brent and Craig Renaud.

It was “Shalane Flanagan Day” in Marblehead, Massachusetts, on Saturday. The town honored the 36-year-old runner for her tremendous career, which includes a historic win in the New York City Marathon earlier this month.

Here & Now‘s Alex Ashlock (@aashlock) reports.

The Do's And Don'ts Of Giving Tuesday

Nov 28, 2017

Following Black Friday and Cyber Monday, holiday shoppers will be presented with a different opportunity: Giving Tuesday.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with CBS News’ Jill Schlesinger (@jillonmoney), host of “Jill on Money” and the podcast “Better Off,” about where to give, how to give and what you can put on your tax forms.

Admit it. You've Googled "Who's Meghan Markle" — or, at least, you thought about it.

A strange and unsettling thing was happening this morning on YouTube. If you typed the words "how to have" into the site's search bar, one of the suggested searches was "how to have s*x with kids."

By the afternoon, that autocomplete result and a few related ones no longer appeared.

Can You Stay Civil By Keeping Quiet?

Nov 21, 2017

When a tough topic comes up around a table of friends and family, it’s all too easy to take a deep breath and hold it in.

Instead of staring down a contentious cousin, it might feel safer to stare at your phone, just to avoid that political debate you’re dreading.

But civility and conversation can lead to better relationships, greater creativity and boost the economy.

GUESTS

Carolyn Lukensmeyer, Executive director, National Institute for Civil Discourse (NICD)

If you haven’t seen it already, you will: the faux fur craze that is taking over retailers at all price points this season. Long, short, colorful and spotted cruelty-free fashion is in.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Kym Canter, CEO and creative director of House of Fluff, about her decision to create a faux fur brand.

Interview Highlights

On growing up a fur aficionado

An enigma that has beguiled art enthusiasts for more than eight decades has finally been solved, after Belgian researchers announced they had found the fourth and final missing piece of René Magritte's The Enchanted Pose.

Using X-ray imaging, researchers with the University of Liège and the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium spotted the upper right corner of the work underneath Magritte's 1935 to 1936 painting God is not a Saint last month. The surrealist had simply painted over it.

Chris Scott spent 13 years in prison for a murder he didn't commit.

Before his time in jail, he led a quiet, domestic life with his two sons and his girlfriend.

Then his life became a nightmare. Scott constantly worried for his safety. He learned to cope in prison, but he knew he had to stay out of trouble, because if his innocence was proved, he wanted to be able to walk free.

You could say Washington, D.C. is also America’s museum capital. And this week, a new collection opens to the public. Just south of the National Mall, the Museum of the Bible will welcome visitors to a $500 million facility that uses a mix of art, technology and lavish architecture to educate guests about Christianity’s sacred text.

Legendary singer Tony Bennett will receive the 2017 Gershwin Prize for Popular Song from the Library of Congress on Wednesday night.

On Monday, Amazon Studios announced it had acquired the rights to bring J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings to television. The ink's still wet on the contract, so details are sketchy.

We know only that it will be an ongoing, multi-season series that will "bring to the screen previously unexplored stories based on J.R.R. Tolkien's original writings," according to the press release — and that it will be set before the Fellowship of the Ring, the first volume of Tolkien's main LoTR saga.

In a series of paintings as fascinating as they are disturbing, artist Alexis Rockman depicts his vision of the Great Lakes. The five major works in the new show “Alexis Rockman: The Great Lakes Cycle” measure 6 feet by 12 feet, and include science-fiction-like representations of water, animals and man-made threats.

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