Listen

federal government shutdown

Updated at 4:56 p.m. ET

President Trump used his veto pen for the first time Friday, after Congress tried to reverse his national emergency declaration and rein in spending on a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Congressional critics do not appear to have the votes to override Trump's veto. So, as a practical matter, the administration can continue to spend billions of dollars more on border barriers than lawmakers authorized, unless and until the courts intervene.

Updated at 4:16 p.m. ET

The Republican-controlled Senate approved a resolution to terminate President Trump's national emergency declaration at the U.S.-Mexico border, putting Congress on a path to its first veto confrontation with the Trump administration.

The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services says families due to receive food assistance in March will be getting it early.  

Jonathan Weiss/Shutterstock

A follow through of the deal reached to end the partial federal government shutdown can't come soon enough as advocates for lower income people say 1.5 million Ohioans are approaching a food crisis. 

cota.com

The Central Ohio Transit Authority is offering furloughed federal workers free 31-day bus passes while the partial government shutdown continues.  

Updated at 6:37 p.m. ET

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross downplayed the hardships caused by a partial government shutdown on Thursday as some 800,000 federal workers prepared to miss a second consecutive payday.

Ross told CNBC he is puzzled by reports of federal workers turning to food banks and other forms of relief, suggesting they should be able to obtain bridge loans to tide them over until the government reopens.

Democrats and immigrant rights groups were quick to oppose President Trump's proposal to end the government shutdown over the weekend because it includes $5.7 billion for an expanded border wall.

Now that they've seen the full language of the bill, they've found other reasons not to like it.

twitter.com

The Columbus Department of Public Utilities will waive penalties for any furloughed federal employees living in the city who are unable to pay their utility bills due finacial hardship caused by the partial government shutdown.  

Ohio Public Radio

Both of Ohio’s U.S. Senators are speaking out against the partial federal government shutdown.