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Faith leaders and activists have been holding events this week to mark the one-year anniversary of Edith Espinal’s sanctuary at a church in Columbus to avoid deportation. 

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This week marks one year since Edith Espinal took sanctuary in the Columbus Mennonite Church. 

The Trump administration cannot withhold federal money to punish local governments for their noncompliance with immigration authorities, according to a ruling by a federal judge in California.

In an order announced Monday, Judge William Orrick permanently blocked the policy, issued as one of President Trump's earliest executive orders, ruling it was "unduly coercive" and violated the separation of powers.

Cities and towns around the country rely on federal policing grants for a variety of expenses, including training, equipment, and personnel. So far there have been no payments.

The Byrne Justice Assistance Grant Program (JAG) provides hundreds of millions of dollars a year to states, tribes, and local governments. And they're usually disbursed by the end of the federal fiscal year on Sept. 30th.

In a move apparently meant to counter the Trump administration's tough approach to immigration enforcement, the California legislature approved a so-called "sanctuary state" bill Saturday that would establish new protections for people living in the country illegally.

Chicago's Mayor Rahm Emanuel is pushing back against the federal government.

On Monday, the city is filing suit against the Department of Justice, which announced it would withhold millions of dollars in police grant money from so-called sanctuary cities.

Emanuel is suing because he says new rules for a federal crime-fighting grant go against the Constitution and the city's values.

"Chicago will not let our police officers become political pawns in a debate," Emanuel said.

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Columbus City Council last night formally codified Mayor Andy Ginther's executive orders issued earlier this year regarding immigration.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is narrowing the scope of an executive order on so-called sanctuary cities.

A federal judge in California last month blocked a key part of that order, reasoning that the Trump administration had overstepped by threatening to yank federal money from those places.

The City of Columbus is taking additional steps to build on its status as a welcoming community to immigrants and refugees.

President Trump has been tweeting about a federal court ruling that temporarily blocked his plan to suspend funding for "sanctuary cities."

These are cities — among them New York, Los Angeles, Houston, Chicago and San Francisco — that have limited their cooperation with federal immigration authorities. For example, they may refuse to detain people who are in the U.S. illegally on behalf of the federal agents.

Now, the Trump tweets:

Ohio Public Radio

A Republican state lawmaker says she wouldn't have promoted her proposed Ohio ban of "sanctuary cities" on a radio show if she'd known that its host advocates white culture and power.

Officials in New York, California and elsewhere say they'll fight Attorney General Jeff Sessions' move to cut off billions in federal grant money to cities that don't share the Trump administration's strict approach to enforcing immigration laws.

"The Trump Administration is pushing an unrealistic and mean spirited executive order," New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted Monday night. "If they want a fight, we'll see them in court."

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The Justice Department is following through on an executive order to withhold as much as $4.1 billion in federal grants from so-called "sanctuary cities," generally defined as places where local law enforcement limit their cooperation with federal authorities on immigration enforcement.

columbusunderground.com

A Short North restaurant is the first in Ohio to declare itself a "sanctuary restaurant." 

cleveland.com

Republican and Democratic state lawmakers are proposing different bills regarding the creation of sanctuary cities, which shield undocumented immigrants from prosecution based on their status.

Ohio Public Radio

The fight over how the state should deal with immigration issues has Statehouse Republicans and Democrats backing different bills.

While confusion continues over President Trump's executive order on immigration, and Statehouse  Republican and Democrats are squaring off over "sanctuary cities" bills, the Columbus Board of Education last night approved a resolution promising a safe environment for all students and staff, regardless of immigration status. 

Cincinnati and Columbus are the latest to adopt policies that stray away from enforcing immigration laws, essentially making them so-called sanctuary cities for immigrants and refugees.

cincinnati-oh.gov

Three Ohio Republicans are challenging Democratic Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley's designation of the queen city as a "sanctuary city." 

WCBE Files

Columbus City officials yesterday responded to executive orders from President Trump banning refugees and immigrants from some countries with a majority Muslim population.