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Alison Holm

Reporter, News Anchor

A native of Chicago, Alison grew up in Cincinnati and lived in several cities that did not begin with the letter "C" before she moved to Columbus. She received a BA from Earlham College and briefly attended Bir Zeit and Hebrew University. After a wide ranging career that included late night jazz host, housing discrimination field investigator, and occupational health video production, she settled on radio news as the best excuse to talk to people for a living. Some of her favorite interviews include Nikki Giovanni, Yo-yo Ma and N'tobo M'beke. Alison has an equal passion for Midwest history, hockey and Slavic poetry.

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Columbus City Schools will hold in-person high school graduation ceremonies June 2nd through the 5th. 

Canton Repository via FBI filing

A Stark County man has been arrested in connection with the violent January riots at the U.S. Capitol.

The fired Columbus police officer accused of killing Andre Hill pleaded not guilty to an additional charge of reckless homicide Wednesday.

$28-point-6 billion in federal aid for restaurants, bars and other qualifying food service businesses becomes available May 3rd through the Restaurant Revitalization Fund.  

A controversial conservative lawmaker from Georgia has announced she will attend a rally at the Ohio Statehouse Saturday, in support of a Columbus cop who shot and killed a teen girl last week.

coronavirus.ohio.gov

It appears the pace of COVID-19 vaccinations is slowing down in Ohio, while the rate of new cases remains stubbornly high.

New legislation on police oversight and accountability is expected to be introduced in the General Assembly in the next few days.

Columbus City Schools is launching COVID vaccination clinics for all students 16 and older beginning Monday.

politico.com

Six-term congressman Steve Stivers Monday announced he will leave the House of Representatives in May, to take over the Ohio Chamber of Commerce. 

Franklin County has returned to the highest level of threat on the state's color-coded Public Health Advisory map.  

An Ohio State University student from Wauseon has been charged in a break-in at Columbus Police Headquarters Tuesday night, following a protest over the police-involved shooting death of a man Monday.

Columbus police clashed Tuesday night with demonstrators after a protest over the fatal police shooting of a Black man Monday.  

Some Ohio COVID-19 vaccination clinics are changing vaccines or pausing after the CDC's recommendation Tuesday to halt use of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine, but state and health officials remain optimistic the state's vaccination program will continue.

Authorities say a man was killed in an exchange of gunfire with police and hospital security in the emergency room at Mt. Carmel St. Ann's Hospital Monday.  

State health officials reported 2,742 new cases of COVID-19 in the past hours and 111 new admissions to hospitals. The number of people currently hospitalized with coronavirus has risen to nearly 12-hundred, the highest since the beginning of March.

All Ohioans over the age of 16 are now eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine and the state is now targeting the younger cohort.  

More than a dozen mass vaccination clinics around the state are open or about to open, and nearly 30 percent of the state's population have received at least one dose of the vaccine.  

But the more easily transmissible variants are increasing dramatically. 92 cases of the variant were reported less than three weeks ago; the state health department reported 620 variant cases Thursday.

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine says the state "can't vaccinate fast enough." 

Lt. Gov. Jon Husted is refusing to apologize for a tweet last week referencing "the Wuhan virus" that drew criticism for being tone-deaf during a time of rising violence against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.  

City of Columbus

A summer of protests following the death of George Floyd was the catalyst for police reform that saw approval of Columbus' first Civilian Police Review Board in the fall.  The first slate of board members was announced Wednesday.

An attorney for the Fraternal Order of Police Friday filed a grievance with the city, and requested a temporary restraining order that would delay six Columbus police officers from meeting with an independent investigator examining potential criminal misconduct during last summer's police brutality protests.  

The restaurant industry, which was hard hit by the pandemic, is starting to feel more optimistic.  

Beginning Friday March 19th, Ohioans age 40 and over, and people with medical conditions such as cancer, heart disease, chronic kidney disease and obesity can schedule a COVID-19 vacccine.  And starting March 29th all adult Ohioans will be eligible.

The Republican U.S. Senate primary in Ohio may be getting a little more crowded.  

Pop-up COVID-19 vaccination clinics will open next week in Columbus and Cincinnati, in addition to 16 long-term clinics that will be sprinkled around the state.  

The Columbus City Schools' teachers union is calling on board member James Ragland to step down following what it calls an "inappropriate and misogynistic" social media post.  

CDC.gov

A seven-day-a-week mass COVID-19 vaccination site capable of delivering 6,000 shots a day will open at Cleveland State University later this month, with support from the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

A year after Ohio began battling the coronavirus, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine announced the state is now on the offense, deploying the vaccine to those most vulnerable.  

As the $1.9 trillion federal relief bill works its way through Congress, it's drawing complaints from some state officials who see their share of funding diminished.  

Ohio Department of Health

After two months, 1.6 million vaccinations have been delivered in Ohio, to over 14 percent of the state's adult population.  And the state is about to receive more vaccines that ever before. 

coronavirus.ohio.gov

As of Thursday, over 1.5 million COVID-19 vaccinations have been delivered in Ohio.  13 percent of the state's adult population have received at least the first dose of the two-shot regimen.  

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