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Alison Holm

Reporter, News Anchor, International Fiduciary Compliance Officer

A native of Chicago, Alison grew up in Cincinnati and lived in several cities that did not begin with the letter "C" before she moved to Columbus. She received a BA from Earlham College and briefly attended Bir Zeit and Hebrew University. After a wide ranging career that included late night jazz host, housing discrimination field investigator, and occupational health video production, she settled on radio news as the best excuse to talk to people for a living. Some of her favorite interviews include Nikki Giovanni, Yo-yo Ma and N'tobo M'beke. Alison has an equal passion for Midwest history, hockey and Slavic poetry.

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The USDA has approved disaster designations for an additional 144 counties affected by the summer drought, including 20 in Ohio.

New License Plates In Spring

Aug 14, 2012

License plates in the Buckeye State will be getting a face lift next spring.

Romney Woos Coal Votes in Eastern Ohio

Aug 14, 2012

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has promised voters in coal-rich eastern Ohio that America won't have to buy oil from Venezuela or the Middle East by the time his second term ends in 2021.  

Ohio has fared better than many states during the recent recession, and a new report released this week shows Central Ohio adding jobs at an accelerated pace.

Number Of Juvenile Sex Offenders Drops

Aug 13, 2012

The number of juvenile sex offenders in the Ohio system has decreased by 17 percent over a three-year period, according to the state agency responsible for overseeing youth.

Eastern Ohio Ranchers Receive Donated Hay

Aug 13, 2012

About 3,000 pounds of hay have been donated to drought-stricken dairy
farmers struggling to feed cattle in eastern Ohio, thanks to a network of Mennonite agencies.
 

Number of Ohio swine flu cases doubles

Aug 8, 2012

The number of confirmed Ohio swine flu cases has doubled to 30, and health officials say the people affected had direct contact with hogs at fairs.

The Ohio State Bar Association is opposing a proposed constitutional amendment that would change how legislative and congressional districts are drawn in the state. 

The CDC has confirmed more cases of a variant of the swine flu in Ohio. The Ohio Department says there are 14 cases in Butler County linked to the county fair. Another case in Clark County was traced to the Ohio State Fair, which sent two pigs home after they tested positive for the H3N2 virus. 

A federal judge overseeing the case against five men charged with plotting to bomb a highway bridge in Ohio won't allow prosecutors to use a recording of what they say is a confession. U.S. District Court Judge David Dowd in Akron ruled Monday that he won't allow the partial audio tape to be played at the trial of 26-year-old Douglas L. Wright of Indianapolis.

The outbreak of swine flu among several dozen people who attended the Butler County Fair last week has been linked to a similar outbreak in Indiana. Health officials say up to 41 people, nearly all of them children, have become sick with symptoms similar to those of a swine flu strain. The southwest Ohio cases are linked to the Butler County Fair, which ended last weekend. 

Ohio's leading education official has issued a public apology after a state watchdog found that he lobbied for a Texas-based standardized testing firm last year while on the company's payroll. Superintendent Stan Heffner said he had shown bad judgment and would accept whatever punishment the Ohio Board of Education deems necessary. 

The US Agriculture Department has classified an additional 218 counties and a dozen states as disaster areas due to the nation's drought. That brings this year's total to nearly 1600 counties in Ohio and 31 other states. More than 90% of them because of the drought. A national monitor map by the University of Nebraska shows Ohio is in a moderate drought. Ohio State University agricultural economist Matt Roberts tells statehouse correspondent Bill Cohen recent rainfall cannot reverse much of the damaged crop yields.

Storms rolling through Central Ohio this afternoon have left over 14,000 people in Franklin County without power, according to American Electric Power.

Holzer Health systems in Gallipolis is hoping a fingerprint collection
program will help it cut down on prescription painkiller abuse. 

After months of speculation, the Columbus Blue Jackets have traded captain Rick Nash to the New York Rangers.  Alison Holm has more.

Board of Regents recommends tobacco-free campuses

Jul 23, 2012

Ohio higher education officials have voted unanimously to urge the state's
public campuses to ban use of all tobacco products, both indoors and
outdoors.

A bomb threat briefly closed the county courthouse in downtown Columbus this morning.

Residents living near the Ohio Turnpike aren't convinced about the benefits state officials say would come by privatizing the toll road. The first public meeting about the plan came last night in Elyria, where Lorain County Commissioner Ted Kalo expressed concerns about increased tolls and sloppy maintenance. 

Ohio's largest police union has thrown its support behind democratic incumbent Sherrod Brown in the state's closely watched campaign for U.S. Senate. It marks the first time in 24 years the fraternal order of police has endorsed a democrat for senate. In a statement, president Jay McDonald cited Brown's opposition to the governor's collective bargaining overhaul as a key factor in its endorsement. The FOP chose brown over republican opponent and state treasurer Josh Mandel. The race continues to draw attention in and outside of The Buckeye State. And as Ohio Public Radio's Karen Kasler reports, it's already setting records.

State prisons director Gary Mohr has approved the first three inmates for a program meant to help ex-cons find work. The program provides information to employers about an inmate's employability. Mohr says it's designed to reduce Ohio's prison population in part by reducing recidivism. 

The director of Ohio State University's Sea Grant program predicts this year's toxic blue-green algae bloom in Lake Erie's Western Basin will be much smaller than last year. A team of researchers collaborated on a seasonal algae prediction, saying this year will be mild compared with worsening blooms over the past few years. The team says there's been less rain than usual, reducing the phosphorus from raw sewage and farm fertilizer runoff that feeds algae growth. The algae produce bacteria that can kill animals and sicken humans.

Ohio officials say only two of the 18 indicted suspects remain at large in a telemarketing scam that allegedly stole millions from people in 41 states over the past five years. Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine's office said Monday that two more members of the ring, including its alleged leader, have been arrested in the past two days - one in Florida and one in Ohio. DeWine says the suspects targeted land owners and led them to believe their property was worth more than it really was.

The Columbus city school board voted last night to postpone a proposed tax levy and bond issue until sometime in 2013. Alison Holm has more.

Utilities, homeowners and businesses coping with storm damage

Jul 2, 2012

Utility crews continue to work to restore power to the some 660-thousand customers affected by storms that ripped through the state Friday afternoon.  another 20-thousand lost power when a second storm system moved through Sunday night. 

'Time out room' lawsuit against school dropped

Jun 27, 2012

A judge has dismissed a lawsuit brought over the Columbus city school
district's use of timeout rooms for children with severe emotional and
behavioral problems.   

A new water quality report shows Ohio's beaches are among the most polluted in the Great Lakes Region -- which is one of the worst in the nation.  Alison Holm has more

New Blue Jackets associate coach named

Jun 20, 2012
Jacques Boissinot/Canadian Press

Veteran NHL coach Craig Hartsburg will join the Columbus Blue Jackets as associate coach.

Two Columbus police officers are under an internal investigation related to military surplus items given to the division through a long-term federal program.

The Columbus City school board voted last night to accept the largest land swap in its history, in a deal with the city that ends up in a win-win -- and new construction -- for both parties.  

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