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Emily Sullivan

The Museum of the Bible said Monday that five of its 16 famous Dead Sea Scrolls fragments are fake.

A team of German experts analyzed the privately funded Washington, D.C., museum's fragments and found they had "characteristics inconsistent with ancient origin." The fragments will no longer be displayed at the museum.

An explosive device was found at the Westchester County, New York, home of billionaire philanthropist George Soros on Monday afternoon.

In a statement to NPR, the Bedford Police Department said an employee of the house found a suspicious package in the mailbox. They opened it, revealing what "appeared to be an explosive device." The employee placed the package in a nearby wooded area and alerted authorities.

Updated 11:01 p.m. ET

Hurricane Willa, which is a Category 3 storm, made landfall near Isla del Bosque, Sinaloa, in Western Mexico.

Willa is "extremely dangerous" and bringing "life-threatening storm surge, wind and rainfall" to Mexico's Pacific Coast, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison issued a national apology Monday on behalf of the government to survivors of institutional child sexual abuse — the first such official statement since a major report last year showed the problem was rampant in Australia.

"Today, as a nation, we confront our failure to listen, to believe, and to provide justice," he said to an audience of hundreds of survivors in Canberra. "We say sorry. To the children we failed, sorry. To the parents whose trust was betrayed and who have struggled to pick up the pieces, sorry."

Updated 8:47 p.m. ET

Hurricane Willa, an "extremely dangerous" storm heading to Mexico's Pacific coast, was downgraded from a Category 5 to a Category 4 by the National Hurricane Center on Monday.

The storm, with maximum sustained winds of nearly 150 mph, is about 100 miles west from Cabo Corrientes, a municipality in southwest Mexico. It is moving north at 8 mph, according to the NHC's latest advisory.

Updated at 9:15 p.m. ET

Saudi Arabian officials confirmed the death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, who had been missing for 18 days, in a statement issued Saturday morning local time.

The statement, translated into English by the Saudi Press Agency, said a preliminary investigation into the events of Oct. 2 revealed that Khashoggi was killed in a fight that broke out while he was visiting the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul.

Updated at 12:56 p.m. ET

StarKist Co. has reportedly agreed to plead guilty to charges of price fixing as part of a conspiracy with two of its competitors to keep the price of canned tuna high.

Federal prosecutors announced the plea agreement on Thursday, which includes a fine of up to $100 million, according to The Associated Press. In the same deal, a former StarKist executive and two former Bumble Bee Foods executives pleaded guilty to price fixing.

A hologram depicting Amy Winehouse, the British singer whose music, addictions and premature death dominated headlines, is expected to embark on a tour, according to Reuters.

Her father, Mitch Winehouse, told the news agency that the singer's hologram will be projected on stage along with her voice and a live band.

Norway issued an apology on Wednesday to women who faced retaliation and public disgrace for having relationships with occupying German forces during World War II.

Up to 50,000 Norwegian women are thought to have had intimate relationships with German soldiers, the BBC reports. Many of them faced government retaliation after the war's end, including illegal arrests, job firings and being stripped of their nationality.

Steve Penny, the former president of USA Gymnastics who has been accused of covering up sexual abuse by sports doctor Larry Nassar, was arrested Wednesday over allegations that he tampered with evidence related to a Nassar investigation.

If convicted, Penny could receive two to 10 years in prison and up to a $10,000 fine.

He was arrested in Gatlinburg, Tenn., after a Texas indictment dated Sept. 28 called for his arrest.

Mohammad Imran, the man convicted of raping and murdering 7-year-old Zainab Ansari and killing at least seven other children in Pakistan, was executed on Wednesday at a prison in the eastern city of Lahore.

Updated at 1:20 p.m. ET

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met with Turkish leaders Wednesday amid the diplomatic crisis over the disappearance of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, and says President Recep Tayyip Erdogan "made clear that the Saudis had cooperated" with Turkey's investigation.

People who were born in New York City and do not identify as male or female can now select the gender-neutral designation of X on their birth certificates.

Mayor Bill de Blasio signed the provision into law last week. In 2014, the city passed a law that removed the requirements of surgery and legal name-change for transgender people who wished to change the gender designated on their birth certificate from female to male or male to female.

Starting Wednesday, the sale of recreational marijuana begins in Canada following a law passed over the summer.

The law says anyone in Canada over the age of 18 is allowed to possess marijuana, provided it's less than 30 grams — just over an ounce. Canadians can also grow up to four marijuana plants in their home and buy from a provincially regulated retailer.

Updated at 8:37 p.m. ET

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has arrived in Saudi Arabia after being dispatched by President Trump to meet with members of the royal court amid growing international tension over the disappearance of prominent Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Khashoggi, an outspoken critic of Saudi policy, has not been seen since he entered the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul two weeks ago.

The U.S. Embassy in Australia issued a lighthearted apology on Monday for an invitation to a "cat pajama-jam" featuring a photo of a cat dressed as the Sesame Street character Cookie Monster that was accidentally sent out by email.

He added that "strong new management controls" would prevent a repeat of the mistake.

There is no information on the photo's origins, but a search by NPR did trace the image to a very pleasing Pinterest page titled "Cats/Dress-up."

The Catholic archdiocese of Washington, D.C., has released a list of 31 clergymen who have been "credibly accused" of abusing children over a decades-long period — a move that comes just days after Pope Francis accepted the resignation of Archbishop Cardinal Donald Wuerl for allegedly covering up sexual abuse in the Church.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis "could" be considering a departure, Saudis can expect "severe punishment" for any involvement in the disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi, and climate change is probably real, but not caused by man, President Trump said in an interview aired Sunday on CBS' 60 Minutes.

Sears — the iconic American retailer that has sold everything from clothing and toys to refrigerators and socket wrenches over its more than 125-year history — may have reached the end. The Sears Holdings company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy on Monday after failing to make a $134 million debt payment.

The mottled spots giraffes are known for aren't random, according to a new study that suggests that the patterns are inherited maternally — and that they may impact the chances of a calf surviving its first few months of life.

The roundness and smoothness of a giraffe's spots are inherited through its mother, wildlife biology researchers reported in the academic journal PeerJ last week.

A Missouri judge ruled on Tuesday that state election officials can no longer tell voters they must show a photo ID in order to cast a ballot. The ruling blocks part of Missouri's voter identification law.

Cole County's Judge Richard Callahan said the state cannot advertise that a photo identification is required to cast a ballot. "No compelling state interest is served by misleading local election authorities and voters into believing a photo ID card is a requirement for voting," he wrote in his ruling.

Updated at 5:30 a.m. ET Thursday

Tropical Storm Michael is weakening as it churns across south-central Georgia.

On Wednesday, Michael was the strongest hurricane to make landfall in the continental U.S. in more than a quarter-century, according to the National Hurricane Center.

The stretch limousine involved in a deadly crash in upstate New York on Saturday had recently failed a state safety inspection and its driver did not have the proper license to drive the vehicle, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Monday.

The crash killed all 18 occupants of the modified limo and two pedestrians. Federal officials said it is the deadliest transportation accident in the U.S. since a 2009 plane crash.

Peru's Supreme Court overturned a medical pardon for the polarizing former President Alberto Fujimori, saying the 80-year-old must return to jail to serve his sentence for crimes against humanity, which cannot be pardoned under Peruvian and international law.

The pardon late last year was described at the time by a group of U.N. human rights experts as "a slap in the face to victims of human rights abuse."

Updated 6:45 a.m. ET

The 2018 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to Dr. Denis Mukwege, a Congolese gynecologist, and Nadia Murad, a Yazidi survivor of rape and captivity by ISIS, for their contributions toward combating wartime sexual assault.

The prize was announced by the Norwegian Nobel Committee in Oslo, Norway, on Friday morning. The committee praised the winners for being symbols in the fight to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict.

On June 5, 1968, hotel busboy Juan Romero raced to congratulate Sen. Robert Kennedy moments after his victory in the California presidential primary. He had met the candidate the day before, bringing him room service at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles.

As Kennedy briefly paused to shake the hand of the 17-year-old, a man named Sirhan Sirhan gunned down Kennedy in front of Romero. A remarkable photograph captured the scene: young Romero, an immigrant from Mexico, cradling the glassy-eyed Kennedy, member of an American political dynasty.

Capitol Police have arrested a man accused of publishing to the Internet restricted personal information about South Carolina Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham.

The FBI has arrested a man in Utah who authorities believe mailed letters to the Pentagon containing castor seeds — a key ingredient in the highly toxic substance ricin.

William Clyde Allen III of Logan, Utah, was arrested by agents with the Salt Lake City Division of the FBI.

Two envelopes mailed to the Pentagon earlier this week tested positive in a screening center for a hazardous substance. After conducting further tests, the FBI determined the envelopes contained castor seeds.

Updated 9:25 a.m. ET

American Frances H. Arnold has won half of the 2018 Nobel Prize in chemistry for her work in changing how chemists produce new enzymes, sharing the prize with another American, George Smith, and Sir Gregory Winter of the U.K. for research that has led to new pharmaceuticals and cancer treatments.

Updated 11:00 p.m. ET

Chocolate cupcake, creme, mango, tutti frutti, "blue" — sugary-sounding flavors familiar to teenage e-cigarette users are facing more crackdowns from the Food and Drug Administration.

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