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Laura Wagner

Sixteen U.S. service members have been disciplined after the Pentagon reviewed the U.S. airstrikes that killed 42 people at a civilian hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan, last fall.

NPR's Tom Bowman reports that none of the military personnel face criminal charges.

The 2016 NFL draft starts tonight so here's our comprehensive first-round mock draft.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has signed legislation that allows mental health counselors and therapists to refuse to treat patients based on religious objections or personal beliefs.

Critics of the law say it could result in discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. As Nashville Public Radio reported earlier this month:

During a news conference in London Friday, President Obama criticized the North Carolina law that requires transgender people to use public bathrooms that correspond to their gender designation at birth.

Obama said he thinks the North Carolina law and similar measures in other states, including Mississippi, "are wrong and should be overturned."

In a Friday afternoon press conference, Carver County Sheriff Jim Olson did not say what led to the death of singer Prince, whose body was found yesterday at his home in Minnesota. He was 57.

Olson did say there were no "obvious signs of trauma" on the singer's body, and that there is no reason to believe his death was a suicide.

FBI Director James Comey said Thursday that the federal government paid a steep fee for help accessing data on the iPhone of one of the San Bernardino attackers.

Just how steep?

"Let's see, more than I will make in the remainder of this job which is seven years and four months, for sure," Comey said at a talk at the Aspen Institute in London.

Considering the FBI director makes around $185,000 a year, that means the bureau shelled out more than $1 million for help cracking into the terrorist's iPhone, NPR's Carrie Johnson reports.

Musician and performer Prince, whose work awed and inspired many other artists, has died at the age of 57.

Our story about his death is here.

The news has drawn shocked, sad reaction from the music industry and beyond, as celebrities express heartbreak and love for the singer on social media.

Here's a roundup of industry tributes, with musicians across genres saying that Prince was a powerful influence.

Two days after mixed martial arts superstar Conor McGregor announced his retirement on Twitter, he delivered a new message: "I AM NOT RETIRED," he wrote in a statement on Facebook.

As some MMA fans suspected, McGregor's retirement announcement on Tuesday was simply a maneuver to gain leverage in his contract disagreement with the Ultimate Fighting Championships, the league that hosts MMA fights.

The U.S. is ranked 41 out of 180 countries in Reporters Without Borders' World Press Freedom Index, which measures the "level of freedom of information in 180 countries."

According to the organization, the U.S. moved from 49 in 2015 to 41 this year, though it warned that the "relative improvement by comparison hides overall negative trends."

Conor McGregor, one of the world's biggest mixed martial arts stars, shocked fans on Tuesday when he said he was retiring.

"I have decided to retire young. Thanks for the cheese. Catch ya's later," he tweeted.

A judge in New York City has sentenced former NYPD officer Peter Liang, who was convicted of manslaughter and official misconduct last month in the 2014 fatal shooting of Akai Gurley, to five years' probation and 800 hours of community service.

Justice Danny Chun also reduced the manslaughter conviction to criminally negligent homicide, NPR's Hansi Lo Wang reports, adding that prosecutors say they will appeal that decision.

To show that the tainted water in Flint, Mich., is safe when filtered, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder says he will be drinking it for the next month when he's at home and at work.

During a visit to Flint on Monday, Snyder said he visited a family's home and drank filtered tap water, according to the Detroit Free Press.

In the 100th year of the Pulitzer Prize, The Associated Press' global reporting called "Seafood from Slaves" won the award for public service.

The series of stories chronicled how the fishing industry was using slave labor to put seafood in American kitchens and restaurants.

After four decades of Olympic glory, the Romanian women's gymnastic team has failed to even qualify for the Summer Games in Rio.

The team — which has medaled in every Olympics since 1976 — missed the top four in a test event on Sunday. The fifth-place finish at the final Olympics qualifying event rules the team out of a spot in the 2016 games.

New York has ended its ban on professional mixed martial arts — the last state in the U.S. to do so — and the Ultimate Fighting Championship wasted no time in announcing a match at Madison Square Garden.

The league said it will host a major pay-per-view event at the storied venue on Nov. 12.

"Our commitment to bringing incredible live events to New York starts immediately," UFC Chairman and CEO Lorenzo Fertitta said at Thursday's bill-signing event with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

The governor echoed that sentiment.

A Connecticut judge has ruled that a lawsuit against the manufacturer and seller of the weapon used in the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012 can proceed.

The gun companies had sought to dismiss the lawsuit filed by nine victims' families and a survivor, which names Remington Arms, maker of the Bushmaster AR-15 rifle, model XM15-E2S; as well as the distributor and seller.

Updated: 1:25 a.m. ET Thursday:

In his final NBA game Wednesday night, Kobe Bryant scored 60 points — helping the Los Angeles Lakers defeat the Utah Jazz, 101-96. He scored 23 points in the final quarter.

The Associated Press reports:

This post was updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

A Texas judge has sentenced Ethan Couch, whose lawyers notoriously presented an "affluenza" defense to argue that he wasn't responsible for killing four people when he was driving drunk, to nearly two years in jail.

Al-Jazeera America, the U.S. news network backed by the ruling family of Qatar, will sign off for good after a three-hour farewell broadcast on Tuesday.

Though the media outlet struggled to gain traction in the U.S., NPR's media correspondent David Folkenflik reports that it held the promise of a noncommercial approach to television news. David says that "after an earlier channel called Al-Jazeera English failed to make a dent in the U.S., Al-Jazeera America was built on the acquisition of a liberal cable network called Current." He adds:

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has charged Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton with securities fraud for allegedly improperly recruiting investors for a high-tech Texas startup.

NPR's Wade Goodwyn reports for our Newscast unit that the federal civil lawsuit accuses Paxton — then a member of the Texas House of Representatives — of defrauding investors when he promoted the tech startup Servergy Inc., without disclosing that he was being paid to do so. Wade says:

The Holy Bible, along with several other books that incorporate aspects of religion, made the American Library Association's list of top 10 most challenged books in 2015.

Friday was a landmark day for the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. It launched into space a resupply capsule bearing a new inflatable habitat for the International Space Station. Then the rocket's "first stage" returned to Earth for a sea landing — without exploding.

Bruce Springsteen has canceled his show scheduled for Sunday in North Carolina as a show of "solidarity" with the people and businesses protesting the state's recently passed HB2 law, which requires that transgender people only use bathrooms that correspond with their sex at birth.

As a drought in Venezuela pushes the country's water levels to extreme lows, President Nicolas Maduro has declared every Friday for the next two months a holiday for public employees to save electricity and water.

Poaching and destruction of habitat have decimated wild tiger populations around the world, especially in Cambodia.

There are no longer any breeding tigers left in the wild in that country, and the species is considered "functionally extinct" there, according to the World Wildlife Foundation.

A New York judge has thrown out pop star Kesha's hate-crime and human rights claims against producer Dr. Luke, who she says sexually and emotionally abused her for years.

Manhattan state Supreme Court Justice Shirley Werner Kornreich cited the facts that the alleged abuses happened "outside New York and beyond the legal time limit" as reasons for why the claims can't move forward, The Associated Press reports.

The judge also said "every rape is not a gender-motivated hate crime," according to the news service.

Four months after former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship was found guilty for his role in a 2010 mining disaster that killed 29 miners, he has been sentenced to the maximum one year in prison and another year of supervised release.

Judge Irene Berger also imposed a maximum $250,000 fine, which is due immediately, West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Dave Mistich reports for NPR's Newscast unit.

In his competitive diving career, four-time Olympic diving gold medalist and five-time world champion Greg Louganis has been all over the world. Now he'll be in one place that's eluded him for years: your kitchen table.

Wheaties announced that Louganis — who is openly gay and HIV-positive — along with two other former Olympians, hurdler Edwin Moses and swimmer Janet Evans, will be featured on the cereal boxes as part of the revamped "legends" series.

In July 2015, World Wrestling Entertainment executive Stephanie McMahon called for better, more important roles for women in professional wrestling.

The investigation into the crash of an Amtrak train just south of Philadelphia on Sunday, in which two people were killed, is ongoing.

A forward-facing video from the train that recorded footage "up to the collision" showed that there was "construction equipment on the track and work train equipment on the track immediately adjacent to the Amtrak train's track," said Ryan Frigo, the National Transportation Safety Board investigator in charge.

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