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Oh, You Know The Answer

Jun 22, 2014

On-air challenge: Every answer is a compound word or familiar two-word phrase or title in which each word has OU as its second and third letters. Example: Given "heading to Antarctica," you would say, "Southbound."

Next week's challenge: From 11-year-old listener Eli Shear-Baggish of Arlington, Mass. Name a certain trip that contains the letter S. Change the S to a C and rearrange the resulting letters. You'll name the location where this trip often takes place. Where is it?

Answer: Safari; Africa

Winner: Jeffrey Techentin of North Kingstown, R.I.

Next week's challenge: Think of a 10-letter adjective describing certain institutions. Drop three letters from this word, and the remaining seven letters, reading left to right, will name an institution described by this adjective. What institution is it?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday at 3 p.m. Eastern.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary. School may be out, but the puzzle master is in. And that, of course, means it is time for the puzzle. Joining me now is Will Shortz. He's of course the puzzle editor of the New York Times, and he's also WEEKEND EDITION'S puzzle master. Good morning, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Lynn. Welcome back.

NEARY: So, Will, refresh our memories. What was last week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yes, it came from an 11-year-old listener, Eli Shear-baggish of Arlington, Massachusetts. And the puzzle was to name a certain trip that contains the letter S, changed the S to a C and rearrange the resulting letters. The result will be a location where this trip often takes place. Where is it? Well, the trip was a Safari. Change the S to a C and rearrange the list letters, you get Africa.

NEARY: Oh, very clever. And I understand there was another clever answer besides that one.

SHORTZ: An almost answer. Several listeners wrote in bus rides, which are trips. And if you change the - one of the S's to a C and rearrange, you get curbside, which is where you would catch a bus. Unfortunately, I asked for a trip singular and bus rides is plural. So I didn't think it quite worked, but really clever.

NEARY: Well, we got nearly 850 correct answers on this one. And our randomly selected winner is Jeff Techentin of North Kingstown, Rhode Island. Congratulations, Jeff. Great job.

JEFFREY TECHENTIN: Well, thank you very much.

NEARY: How'd you figure this out?

TECHENTIN: Nothing elegant or clever about it, I'm afraid. It was pretty much the application of brute force.

(LAUGHTER)

TECHENTIN: Just going through the different trips that I could think of that involve the letter S. I thought, probably, it's not going to be a sort of trip that winds you up in Haight-Ashbury.

(LAUGHTER)

TECHENTIN: So - and that doesn't have a C. So I just kept going through and I came across Safari. And as soon as I hit that, I realized it was going to be Africa.

NEARY: Oh, that's great. How long have you been playing the puzzle?

TECHENTIN: Well, I've been listening for a little while, but I have been only sending in answers for a couple of weeks.

NEARY: A couple of weeks? You're very lucky.

TECHENTIN: I am very fortunate.

NEARY: (Laughing) All right then, Jeff. Are you ready to play the puzzle?

TECHENTIN: I am.

NEARY: Good. Let's play.

SHORTZ: All right, Jeff and Lynn. Every answer today is a compound word or a familiar two-word phrase or title in which each word has O-U as its second and third letters. For example, if I said heading to Antarctica say, you would say southbound. So O-U in the second and third positions. And your first clue is a thick bread, popularized in America during the California gold rush.

TECHENTIN: That would be sourdough.

SHORTZ: That's it. One who talks a lot and at high volume.

TECHENTIN: A loudmouth?

SHORTZ: That's it. Where the king and his money are in "Sing A Song of Sixpence." And specifically the line goes the king was in his...

TECHENTIN: Counting house.

SHORTZ: Counting house, good. 1963 hit for The Kingsmen.

TECHENTIN: Louie, Louie.

SHORTZ: Louie, Louie, yeah. Start of a multipart meal. It's served in a bowl.

TECHENTIN: Soup?

SHORTZ: Yes.

TECHENTIN: Start of a meal?

SHORTZ: Yes. Start of a meal and, you know...

TECHENTIN: Soup course?

SHORTZ: ...There's the entree. Soup course it is. Classic French cabaret.

TECHENTIN: "Moulin Rouge."

SHORTZ: Good. Playing area in tennis where there are two players on each side.

TECHENTIN: That would be a court.

SHORTZ: Yeah, what kind of court when there's two players?

TECHENTIN: Doubles court?

SHORTZ: You're playing them on the doubles court, right. Activity of showing someone around the home.

TECHENTIN: House tour.

SHORTZ: That's it. House tour. Each of the last two answers has three words, all of which have O-U as their second and third letters. And your first one of these is in Patty LaBelle's 1975 hit "Lady Marmalade" words before avec moi?

TECHENTIN: Voulez-vous coucher.

(LAUGHTER)

SHORTZ: (Laughing) Voulez-vous coucher, well said. And your last one, the largest circulation newspaper in Kentucky.

TECHENTIN: The Louisville something.

SHORTZ: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

SHORTZ: You got the Louisville part.

TECHENTIN: Courier?

SHORTZ: Yeah. It starts with a J.

TECHENTIN: Journal.

SHORTZ: The Louisville Courier-Journal is it. Nice job

TECHENTIN: Thank you.

NEARY: Hey, Jeff, that was great. You did a wonderful job. I was very impressed. Thanks for playing the puzzle today. And of course, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. Now tell us your public radio station.

TECHENTIN: I am a sustaining member of WRNI here in Rhode Island.

NEARY: Jeff Techentin of North Kingstown. Thanks so much for playing the puzzle this week.

TECHENTIN: Thank you very much. It's been a pleasure.

NEARY: And, Will, what's the challenge for next week?

SHORTZ: Yes. Think of a 10-letter adjective describing certain institutions. Drop three letters from this word, and the remaining seven letters, reading left to right, will name an institution described by this adjective. What institution is it? So again, a 10-letter adjective describing certain institutions. Drop three letters from this word and the remaining seven letters, reading left to right, will name an institution described by this adjective. What institution is it?

NEARY: All right, there you have it. And when you have the answer, go to our website npr.org/puzzle and click on the submit your answer link. Just one entry per person please, and our deadline for entries is Thursday, June 26 at 3 p.m. Eastern Time. Please include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner, we'll give you a call. And you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of the New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION'S puzzle master, Will Shortz. Thanks so much, Will. Fun talking with you.

SHORTZ: Thank you, Lynn. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.