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All Things Considered

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Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting in context and transformed the way listeners understand the world. Heard by more than 10 million people on over 560 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of insightful news mixed with commentary and interviews, as well as special - sometimes quirky - features.

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There's a new political ad out today from the Democratic National Committee. It highlights what Democrats consider Mitt Romney's greatest weakness: his inconsistency. NPR's Brian Naylor reports.

A Look At The Cult Of Tim Tebow

Nov 28, 2011

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This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

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And I'm Guy Raz.

Another win for Tim Tebow.

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Baker Discusses New Smart Meters

Nov 28, 2011

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From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

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And I'm Guy Raz. And it's time for All Tech Considered.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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The song "Moves Like Jagger" has been on the Billboard Hot 100 for five months — it peaked at No. 1 and is still holding on at No. 5.

Whether you want to or not, you've probably heard the songs on the top-100 list in the U.S. But do you know what's hot right now in West Africa or China? Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Rachel Martin finds out what music is popular in Hong Kong and Dakar by talking to music critics Ben Sin and Rose Skelton. They each pick three favorite songs that best represent the music scene in their cities.

Chart Hits From Hong Kong And Senegal

Nov 27, 2011

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This is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED From NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

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Cruising To Mars: The Rover's Tasks

Nov 26, 2011

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Earlier today, NASA's latest Mars mission left Earth heading on its journey to the Red Planet.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Three, two, one. Main engine start. Zero and liftoff of the Atlas V with Curiosity, seeking clues to the planetary puzzle about life on Mars.

Marine's Life Forever Altered By War

Nov 26, 2011

Andrew Robinson was injured by a roadside bomb during his second deployment to Iraq. Now a quadriplegic, he says he is learning how to use his limited mobility and is proud of having protected his fellow soldiers. He is especially motivated because his wife is expecting twins next month.

If you turn to page 109 of Lindsay McCrum's photo book, you'll see a photo of a woman wearing jeans and a green baseball cap standing in a grassy field. She's looking straight at the camera, clutching a semi-automatic rifle as if it were a water bottle. Standing between her legs is her son, his blond hair peeking out from behind her thigh as he poses with his toy gun, a miniature of his mother's.

For Pesky Relatives, A Musical Gift Guide

Nov 25, 2011

When Rachel Martin was given a slot guest-hosting weekends at All Things Considered, she took the opportunity to get a little holiday shopping out of the way. Needing musical stocking stuffers for a few pesky relatives — her fiance's mom, for example, or her dad, who likes "Tchaikovsky and Johnny Cash" — she consulted NPR Music's Stephen Thompson, and asked him for some tips.

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From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Guy Raz.

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For a broader view of what's happening now in Egypt, we're joined by Samer Shehata, who is in Alexandria. He's an assistant professor of Arab politics at Georgetown University.

Samer Shehata, welcome.

PROFESSOR SAMER SHEHATA: Thank you for having me.

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A case in a Florida court could fundamentally change the way Sea World and other marine parks operate. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or OSHA, cited Sea World last year for safety violations after a trainer was drowned by one of the killer whales.

Letters: A Thanksgiving Tale

Nov 25, 2011

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It's been an All Things Considered Thanksgiving tradition since 1991— a Bailey White original short story. Over the years, White's stories have included tales about a rose queen, a telephone man, an ostrich farmer and a wife exacting revenge. This year, White presents "Call It Even." It's about a shy painter who moves from Florida to Vermont and wants to feel like he fits in — so he raises a dozen turkeys.

Ingrid Gerdes: A Tomboy With Soul

Nov 24, 2011

Originally from Springfield, Mo., "the Ozarks area of Missouri," Ingrid Gerdes is a neo-soul performer out of Boston, but she considers herself a Southern singer. Her latest album is titled Shed.

Boom Town, U.S.A.

Nov 23, 2011

In the small-town of Elko, ambition looks like high-heel suede booties on the floor of the auto shop at the local high school.

Brandi and Kaylee look like the Olsen twins. And they're the best auto-shop students at Elko High. The girls have a plan. Everyday out the school window, they see trucks heading up to the gold mines. Day and night. So, the girls figure, why not open a truck repair shop after they graduate?

"In Elko we've been really blessed and really lucky to actually have a good economy," Kaylee says. "We can actually have our hopes and dreams."

Nov. 23, 1936, was a good day for recorded music. Two men, an ocean apart, each stepped up to a microphone and began to play. One was a cello prodigy who had performed for the queen of Spain; the other was a guitar player in the juke joints of the Mississippi Delta. But on that day, Pablo Casals and Robert Johnson each made recordings that would change music history.

Pentagon Faces Significant Cuts

Nov 23, 2011

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The U.S. Office of Special Counsel is one of those small corners of the government with an important mission: It's supposed to help protect federal whistle-blowers and shield civil service workers from politics.

But during the Bush years, the office was engulfed in scandal. It was raided by FBI agents, and its chief was indicted for obstructing justice.

It's into that unsettled environment that the new leader, Carolyn Lerner, arrived five months ago. And good government groups say she's already taking the office in new directions.

The congressional supercommittee announced Monday that it failed to come to an agreement on reducing the deficit. After three months of negotiating, the Democrats and Republicans just couldn't agree on how much spending to cut or how high to raise taxes.

But this is not a story about how the left and right disagree with each other. In fact, they actually largely agree.

The government is expected to shut down at least 3,000 post offices — and one hobbyist who visits post offices around the country has taken notice.

Evan Kalish collects hand-cancellation marks and blogs about it on Going Postal, where he posts photographs of each location.

Kalish, who's also a graduate student at the University of Pennsylvania in geospatial analytics, started his hobby right out of college — and he has run up an impressive tally of how many he's visited: 2,745.

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Supercommittee Fails To Reach Debt Deal

Nov 21, 2011

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When I was a kid, I assumed that in the future things would get better and better until we were all driving flying cars and playing badminton with space aliens on top of 500-story buildings. Frankly, I kind of counted on this happening. But now I don't assume that we'll just keep going up anymore.

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