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About the Show: Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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A few months before his death, Colin Powell spoke with Bob Woodward of The Washington Post about his health.

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The Department of Education knows it has a big problem on its hands. Many children in America have been struggling with mental health, and the pandemic has made things much worse.

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A lawmaker from the U.K.'s ruling Conservative Party has died after being attacked today. He was stabbed during a public meeting with his constituents in Southend-on-Sea in the southeast of England. And NPR's London correspondent Frank Langfitt is on this story. Frank, hi.

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For the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court, Monday marks the first time nearly all of them will gather together in the courtroom since the lockdown a year and a half ago. But if some of the justices greet the new term with great anticipation for a new conservative legal era, others likely are facing the term with dread.

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Positive results this morning from a study of a new drug to treat COVID-19 - according to a news release from the drug company Merck, the drug cut hospitalization or death in half for people sick with COVID.

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All right. With us now is Congressman Fred Upton of Michigan. He's a Republican who supports the bipartisan infrastructure bill. He is also a member of the Problem Solvers Caucus. Good morning, Congressman Upton.

FRED UPTON: Well, good morning to you.

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Two Supreme Court justices are open to rewriting a 50-year-old ruling that protects the press from lawsuits. How would that change journalism? Here's NPR's David Folkenflik.

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It's been one month since the Taliban reasserted control in Afghanistan. And they've gradually introduced rules and policies for how they intend to run the country this time around.

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Let's talk about the various deadlines lawmakers face with Democratic Representative Ro Khanna of California and a member of the Congressional Progressive Caucus.

Congressman, welcome.

RO KHANNA: Thank you for having me.

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Good morning. I'm Noel King.

Updated September 30, 2021 at 12:25 PM ET

The NBA has returned and back with it are COVID-19 worries.

For a third season the association is navigating operating games while trying to avoid spreading the coronavirus.

This time around they have a new move: Vaccines — but not all players say they're ready to take them. The vast majority of players in the league are vaccinated, but some high-profile athletes have said they won't disclose if they're vaccinated or not.

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A judge suspended Jamie Spears' conservatorship of his daughter's estate yesterday. And outside of the LA courtroom, Britney's fans cheered. NPR's Mandalit del Barco was there.

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Facebook faces a Senate committee today as it pauses plans to build a version of Instagram aimed at kids 10 to 12 years old. It's the latest in a long list of public crises for the company, which, we should note, is a financial supporter of NPR.

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For the first time, doctors are reporting that they have restored vision to people blinded by a rare genetic disorder using the revolutionary gene-editing technique known as CRISPR.

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