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About the Show: Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Each morning you'll also hear local news from WCBE reporters, traffic reports every twenty minutes and every morning at 6:50am, The Marketplace Morning report.

NEW! Monitor traffic flow by clicking here to view ODOT & the City of Columbus' new TRAFFIC CAM. Use this resource to plan your best route on the central Ohio roadway network.

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More than 200 of the world's leading climate scientists will begin meeting today to finalize a landmark report summarizing how Earth's climate has already changed, and what humans can expect for the rest of the century.

Updated July 26, 2021 at 9:00 PM ET

President Biden is in a tough place on immigration.

On one side, he faces growing pressure from supporters who want his administration to stop turning away asylum-seekers — and to invest more political capital on creating a pathway to citizenship for the nation's 11 million undocumented immigrants.

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Back around the start of the year, Michael Thurmond had a problem. He's the top elected official in DeKalb County, Ga. Congress had approved about $50 billion to help people catch up and pay rent to avoid eviction.

But Thurmond worried that his county wouldn't get enough money to help everybody.

"What do I say to the family who is the first in line after all the money has run out?" he asks.

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After a quick trip to the edge of space, Amazon's founder Jeff Bezos is back on Earth.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

JEFF BEZOS: Control, Bezos - best day ever.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON: Yeah.

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Updated July 20, 2021 at 3:02 PM ET

With the highly contagious delta variant fueling a rise in COVID-19 cases, Dr. Jerome Adams — the surgeon general under former President Donald Trump who once advised against mask-wearing — now says even the vaccinated may need to mask up.

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Is a Jewish nationalist with a loyal following, a member of Israel's parliament, inciting violence between Jews and Arabs? Here's NPR's Deborah Amos from Jerusalem.

Updated July 22, 2021 at 8:03 AM ET

Maj. Melissa Elledge deployed to combat zones twice in earlier versions of body armor designed for a male-centric Army, so she's deeply familiar with their failings for women. The bad fit created potentially lethal gaps at the arm openings and left the heavy ceramic plates resting on her legs, cutting off circulation as she sat in trucks or aircraft.

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And let's discuss this more with Haiti's ambassador to the United States. Bocchit Edmond is on the line from Maryland. Welcome to the program, sir.

BOCCHIT EDMOND: Good morning to you, Steven.

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U.S. forces and their allies may have largely left Afghanistan. But the country's four-decade-long war continues. NPR's Diaa Hadid reports.

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Updated July 14, 2021 at 1:03 PM ET

Criminal courthouses across the United States are confronting massive case backlogs as they begin slowly reopening after long pandemic shutdowns. It has some prosecutors preparing to drop so-called "low-level cases" because they will not be able to handle the expected crush of speedy trial demands.

Prosecutors in Chicago, for example, are preparing to drop a large number of criminal cases when the courts fully reopen later this year.

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(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HOW YOU LIKE THAT")

BLACKPINK: (Singing) How you like that?

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