Listen

Arts + Life

Arts + Life

Kieve and Oliver talk about Kehinde Wiley’s Portrait of Obama. Wiley paints black and brown folk in street close posed as famous portraits and statues to give power and history back to folks who have had theirs erased in Western centric museums. The pair discuss President Obama’s choice of a fantastical portrait as well as the significance of different elements of the painting.

Looking back on his early career, Howard Stern remembers being "petrified" that he wasn't going to be able to make a living. "All the sexual antics, the religious antics, the race antics — everything that I talked about, every outrageous thing that I did — was to entertain my audience and grow my audience," he says. "Whether you liked it or not, or the person down the street liked it or not — I didn't care as long as I kept growing that audience."

Foley

Grove City's Little League baseball season began this past weekend. Saturday also marked another opening day for the city's league that's dedicated to children with special needs.

Rosanna Jones

Kieve and Jessi, author of poetry chapbook Too Tender For Keeping, discuss a piece from the series, Skin, by UK artist Rosanna Jones. Rosanna Jones’s paint and photo collages serve as a springboard for Kieve and Jessi to discuss power between veiwer and art object, commercial versus fine art, identity and fashion and much more. Some platforms do not properly show the links, if this is the case visit wcbe.org for links to the art discussed.

Please Touch The Art host Kieve Rodeheaver interviews Jacs Fishburne about their work in progress: Neural, a fiber piecefor their master’s thesis and two woven photographs. Starting with Neural the pair discusses grief, chronic illness, pain, the desire to connect through touch, and the process of making. With the photographs they talk about interacting with their art in space, sexuality, and collaborating with the dance troupe Sea-Bus. Neural can be seen in the current Columbus College of Art and Design MFA thesis show, Replacing the Sun? through the next few weeks.

Foley

Columbus Gives Back celebrates 10 years of service with a special event Monday evening. The nonprofit uses its own network of nearly 800 volunteers to help other groups in the region. 

A musical in town for a limited run marks a special homecoming for one of the cast members. 

I remember when I was 17, I got dumped. It was hard. I was heartbroken. But I started watching this movie on TV. I had heard of Woody Allen, but really, as a young kid in Steubenville Ohio, you had better odds of having an original opera produced than seeing a Woody Allen movie anywhere.But I watched this movie and it was Annie Hall. And suddenly my life changed. I couldn't believe I was seeing all this heartache and anxiety represented onscreen - along with all the humor of real life.

Actor Burt Reynolds, who played good ol' boys and rugged action heroes in an acting career that spanned seven decades, has died. Reynolds died Thursday morning at a Florida hospital following a heart attack. He was 82.

Let’s get a little graphic! WCBE is presenting a graphic art design contest to central Ohio artists. We’re looking to feature a piece created specifically for WCBE 90.5 at our studios! Read on for contest requirements and winner prizes. Deadline for submissions is August 27th at 5pm.

 

Contest requirements for WCBE’s Get Graphic Content

Size: 5ft x 4ft, but can be sized down to 5in x 4in

Suspect Charged with a High School Bomb Threat

Jun 6, 2018

Suspect Charged with a High School Bomb Threat

Actor Danny Trejo came of age in the California prison system, doing time in a juvenile detention center as well as in San Quentin, Folsom and Soledad, on charges relating to drugs. He says that background prepared him well for acting.

"Standing on the yard in San Quentin, knowing that there's a riot coming, you're absolutely scared to death with every fiber of your body," Trejo says. "[But] you have to pretend you're not. You have to stand there and make everybody think you like it."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

It's been nearly two years since we heard someone say...

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "AMERICAN IDOL")

RYAN SEACREST: This is "American Idol."

Emperor penguins are known to be social and curious. But you probably didn't know that they are also reasonably good at framing a video shot.

When an expeditioner with the Australian Antarctic Division left his camera on the ice while visiting a penguin colony, the birds quickly hustled over to investigate.

It's worth noting that the penguins did not actually push the record button – it was already rolling — but did manage to produce a hilarious 38-second video.

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Decoding Our Emotions.

About Tiffany Watt Smith's TED Talk

Did past generations experience and express emotions the same way we do? Probably not, says historian Tiffany Watt Smith — perceptions of our emotions depend on the time and place.

About Tiffany Watt Smith

Climate scientists Zoe Courville, 42, and Lora Koenig, 40, met more than a decade ago in the middle of the Greenland ice sheet where they were colleagues — before either of them had kids.

Now, Koenig, who lives in Colorado, has two sons, and Courville, who lives in Vermont, has one son.

The working moms are often away from home for weeks at a time studying the impacts of climate change in remote areas of the world. It was especially hard at first to be thousands of miles away from their families, the researchers say in a StoryCorps conversation.

Former President Barack Obama is in negotiations with Netflix to produce a series of high-profile shows, according to a story in The New York Times.

The paper, citing people who are familiar with the "advanced" discussions, reports:

Marvel's Jessica Jones follows an alcoholic private eye who has superstrength and serious anger issues.

In a scene from the show's second season, due Thursday on Netflix, Jessica gets a little carried away in anger management class. She bounces a rubber ball against a wall while talking about what makes her emotional: "My whole family was killed in a car accident. Someone did horrific experiments on me. I was abducted, raped and forced to kill someone." Eventually, the wall gives way.

Updated at 11:30 p.m ET

The city of San Francisco is joining the cause of removing old statues that are out of step with contemporary political and cultural tastes.

The sculpture "Early Days" sits near San Francisco's City Hall. It depicts a vaquero and a missionary standing over a sitting Native American.

Bal Krishna is the name sometimes given to the young Hindu god Krishna. Balkrishna Doshi was named for him, when he was born in 1927.

"They wanted me to remain young," the 90-year-old architect explains, as he bursts into peals of laughter.

Doshi is the newest winner of the Pritzker Architecture Prize, known as the Nobel for architects.

Thirty-something comic actors Nick Kroll and John Mulaney are well beyond adolescence, but they still remember the indignities, hormone rushes and confusion of puberty — and they channel it all in their animated comedy Netflix series, Big Mouth.

The show centers on a group of junior high kids whose bodies are in flux. Mulaney describes his character, Andrew, as a boy in "rapid puberty mode. ... There's a lot of body hair appearing. There's a lot of compulsions appearing."

The first season of the FX comedy Atlanta didn't just introduce its characters through a series of memorable vignettes about relationships, music, weed and money. It gradually broke down expectations until it could do almost anything. It could cast a black actor to play Justin Bieber without elaborating. It could turn itself into a half-hour send-up of a low-budget cable talk show. It stretched the boundaries in which it existed, and in the second season, it feels more settled — and not in a bad way.

It's been entirely too long since we got to spend time with Audie Cornish, one of the hosts of All Things Considered and one of our favorite people. It's also been a busy time of Oscar preparation and midseason premieres. So what better way to spend a very silly chunk of studio time than with a return to one of our favorite segments?

Thousands gathered in Mumbai to pay final respects to Bollywood superstar Sridevi Kapoor, whose film career spanned five decades. She died in Dubai over the weekend at age 54.

Dubai police said the legendary Bollywood leading lady and film producer drowned in her hotel bathtub after losing consciousness. Initial reports said the cause of death was cardiac arrest. Her body was flown back to India late Tuesday in a private plane owned by Anil Ambani, a powerful Mumbai industrialist.

We're one week into the 2018 contest and love what we're seeing. Submissions have already come in from all over the country featuring music and desks ofall varieties. With that, we'd like to take a moment to celebrate the first entry we received: Ian Bamberger's "A Privateer's Eyes."

The global box office success of Black Panther is no surprise to UCLA sociologist Darnell Hunt. His annual report on Hollywood diversity argues that movies and TV shows with diverse casts and creators pay off for the industry's bottom line.

There has been a lot of scary news about big data — about corporations or government invading your privacy. But imagine if we could use our data to make our lives better.

That is at the center of artist Laurie Frick's work — she wants to help create a future in which self-delusion is impossible. In fact, she thinks this shift is inevitable once people wake up to the transformational power of big data.

It's no exaggeration to say the new NBC series Good Girls has one of the most promising casts a network show has sported in a while. It has Retta, one of the indispensable members of the Parks and Recreation ensemble. It has Mae Whitman, who's been a terrific actress since she was tiny. It has Christina Hendricks, who gave such depth to Joan Holloway Harris on Mad Men. It even has Zach Gilford, who played the still-waters-run-deep quarterback Matt Saracen on Friday Night Lights.

France's most famous museum recently designated two rooms for paintings looted by Nazis in World War II. The rightful owners of these works never have been found, and the Louvre says the exhibit is a continuation of the search. But critics say the museum has not done nearly enough over the years.

Pages