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Brett Kavanaugh

The new anti-abortion tilt of the U.S. Supreme Court has inspired some states to further restrict the procedure during the first trimester of pregnancy and move to outlaw abortion entirely if Roe v. Wade ever falls. But the rush to regulate has exposed division among groups and lawmakers who consider themselves staunch abortion opponents.

The Supreme Court appeared sharply divided on the question of whether there's any limit on what the courts can impose on partisan redistricting, also known as gerrymandering, with Justice Brett Kavanaugh, the newest member of the court, appearing at least somewhat conflicted.

"I took some of your argument in the briefs and the amicus briefs to be that extreme partisan gerrymandering is a real problem for our democracy," Kavanaugh told the lawyers arguing the case, "and I'm not going to dispute that."

With a newly configured U.S. Supreme Court, the stakes are high for abortion-rights battles at the state level. Abortion-rights advocates and opponents are preparing for a busy year — from a tug-of-war over Roe v. Wade to smaller efforts that could expand or restrict access to abortion.

Statehouse News Bureau

Ohio has moved again to impose some of the most far-reaching abortion restrictions in the nation, after Republican Governor John Kasich signed a ban Friday on dilation and evacuation terminations and set up a showdown with lawmakers over his veto of the so-called heartbeat bill.

Ohio Public Radio

Since President Trump took office, thousands of Ohio women have been rallying at the White House and the Statehouse. 

cleveland.com

Democratic U.S. Senator Kamala Harris on Sunday urged Ohio Democrats to channel their anger, anxiety and sadness about the confirmation process involving new U.S. Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh into ousting Republicans from power this fall. 

Associated Press

Democratic U.S. Senator Kamala Harris of California has canceled two planned appearances in Cincinnati to remain in Washington for Judge Brett Kavanaugh's U.S. Supreme Court confirmation vote.

Associated Press

Republican U.S. Senator Rob Portman of Ohio says he supports but is not happy about holding additional Judicary Committee hearings next week on U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. 

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

As the confirmation vote for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh neared, both parties had seen potential political benefits for them in the upcoming midterm elections.

For Republicans, it was a chance to energize the base by putting another conservative justice on the court, potentially reshaping it for a generation.

For Democrats, the specter of rolling back abortion rights, the Affordable Care Act and more was a way to further energize an already engaged liberal base to go to the polls.

politifact.com

Democratic U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown of Ohio said in a statement Friday that after careful consideration and meeting this week with U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, he will not support the nomination. 

Senate Democrats, who are divided on abortion policy, are instead turning to health care as a rallying cry for opposition to Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump's Supreme Court nominee.

Specifically, they are sounding the alarm that confirming the conservative U.S. Court of Appeals judge could jeopardize one of the Affordable Care Act's most popular provisions — its protections for people with pre-existing health conditions.