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Centers For Disease Control And Prevention

Men are dying after opioid overdoses at nearly three times the rate of women in the United States. Overdose deaths are increasing faster among black and Latino Americans than among whites. And there's an especially steep rise in the number of young adults ages 25 to 34 whose death certificates include some version of the drug fentanyl.

Trump administration health officials are spelling out their ambitious plan to stop the spread of HIV in the U.S. within the next 10 years.

The plan would target 48 counties where the rate of HIV spread is the highest, along with Washington, D.C., and San Juan, Puerto Rico. Seven states with high rates of HIV in rural areas would also be targeted, including Oklahoma, Missouri, Kentucky, Arkansas, Alabama, South Carolina and Mississippi.

For the first time in U.S. history, a leading cause of deaths — vehicle crashes — has been surpassed in likelihood by opioid overdoses, according to a new report on preventable deaths from the National Safety Council.

Americans now have a 1 in 96 chance of dying from an opioid overdose, according to the council's analysis of 2017 data on accidental death. The probability of dying in a motor vehicle crash is 1 in 103.

The major cause of death in children aged 1 to 19 years is not cancer or other another medical condition. It's injury. And by a long shot – 61 percent, versus 9 percent for cancer.

The largest cause of injury was motor vehicle crashes, and next was firearms, according to a study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study sorts through the 20,360 deaths of U.S. children and adolescents in 2016, as counted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Fentanyl is now the drug most frequently involved in overdose deaths in the U.S., according to a National Vital Statistics System report published Wednesday from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The report sheds a bright light on the changing nature of America's drug landscape — and the devastating number of overdose deaths that have occurred in the U.S. in recent years.

If you take the long view, international health organizations have much to be encouraged about when it comes to the global fight against measles. From 2000 to 2017, for instance, the annual number of measles-related deaths dropped 80 percent — from a toll of over half a million to just under 110,000 last year.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has traced an ongoing E. coli outbreak to romaine lettuce grown in the Central Coastal region of California.

Lettuce from other parts of the U.S. and Mexico is safe to eat, the CDC says. However, if you're not sure where your romaine lettuce came from, err on the side of caution and throw it out, health experts say.

A total of 43 people in 12 states have been infected in this outbreak. No deaths have been reported.

Cut Caesar salad off the menu this week: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says a multistate E. coli outbreak is underway, and romaine lettuce is to blame.

Thirty-two people are sick, including 13 who were hospitalized; no deaths have been reported. An additional 18 people were sickened in Canada.

Evidence points toward romaine lettuce as the likely source, but the CDC can't get more specific than that.

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The Ohio Department of Health says four cases of a rare, mysterious illness that can paralyze children have been confirmed in the state amid an increase in such cases nationally. 

The Franklin County Coroner is reporting five overdose deaths in the past 24 hours. The deaths are on top of at least 13 others in the past week.

For the fourth year in a row, federal health officials report that there has been a sharp increase in sexually transmitted diseases in the U.S. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tallied nearly 2.3 million cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis in 2017 — an increase of 200,000 cases over the previous year, and a record high.

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Chipotle says it will retrain all restaurant employees on food safety procedures starting next week after the Centers for Disease Control said stool samples taken from customers of a Powell eatery were positive for clostridium perfringens, a disease that occurs when food is left at unsafe temperatures. 

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Delaware County health officials say state testing of food samples from a Chipotle restaurant in Powell turned up negative for harmful bacteria. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is telling people not to eat Kellogg's Honey Smacks cereal, which has been linked to an outbreak of salmonella infections now numbering at least 100 people in 33 states.

"Do not eat this cereal," the agency declared on Twitter.

foodsafetynews.com

The Ohio Department of Health says a 73-year-old Hancock County woman is the first state resident to contract salmonella from pre-cut melons. 

foodsafetynews.com

Federal health officials say a salmonella outbreak linked to pre-cut melon has sickened 60 people in Ohio and four other Midwestern states. 

A new  report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds suicide rates rose in nearly every state from 1999 through 2016. 

There's more bad news about the nation's devastating opioid epidemic.

In just one year, overdoses from opioids jumped by about 30 percent, according to a report released Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says Ohio’s drug overdose death rate rose 39 percent between mid-2016 and mid-2017 — the third-largest increase of any state.

The Public Children Services Association of Ohio says the opioid crisis is overwhelming the foster care system as more children are removed from the homes of addicted parents.

Health officials are warning that the United States may have an unusually harsh flu season this year.

But they stress that flu seasons are notoriously difficult to predict, and it's far too early to know for sure what may happen.

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More than half of Ohio's Petland-related Camplyobacter infections are in Franklin County. 

More than half of female homicide victims were killed in connection to intimate partner violence — and in 10 percent of those cases, violence shortly before the killing might have provided an opportunity for intervention.

That is according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, published Thursday, that takes a close look at the homicides of women.

The U.S. is in the midst of an opioid crisis. Millions of Americans are addicted to the powerful prescription painkillers, and tens of thousands are dying each year from overdoses.

A new report out Thursday offers a bit of hope: Doctors are prescribing opioids less often, and the average dose they're giving patients has dropped, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Changes in when public schools start their day are coming to one local district.

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Columbus City Council last night approved two tax breaks totaling for Columbus-based Huntington Bancshares to convert a vacant Cleveland Avenue grocery store into an office building with 14 hundred workers.

Ten years after Ohio voters approved a statewide indoor smoking ban, experts point to a host of resulting benefits

Columbus Public Health

Several events are being held around Columbus today to mark World AIDS Day, an annual observance to raise awareness, support people living with HIV-AIDS, remember those who have died, and encourage others to get tested.

The Kaiser Family Foundation says Ohio leads the nation in opioid overdose deaths.

The Centers for Disease Control says suicide was the 10th leading cause of death for children ages 5 to 11 in 2014.

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