Listen

Child Health

On the new episode of Prognosis Ohio, part of the WCBE Podcast Experience, Dan Skinner talks with Dr.

aecf.org

A report released Monday by the non-partisan Annie E. Casey Foundation shows how the concurrent health and economic crises are exacerbating disparities in access to basic needs for families.

mccourt.georgetown.edu

A new Georgetown University report shows between 2016 and 2019, the number of Ohio children without health insurance rose by 27 thousand to 131 thousand. 

For the past few months Prognosis Ohio has been spotlighting candidates in Ohio who have a particular interest in health and health care. On this week’s episode, Dan Skinner talks with State Representative Allison Russo of the 24th House district about her campaign for reelection. Russo’s background in the health field shapes her positions and values as a representative.

The vast majority of children dying from COVID-19 are Hispanic, Black or Native American, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Researchers analyzed the number of coronavirus cases and deaths among people under the age of 21 that were reported to the CDC between Feb. 12 and July 31 of this year. They found more than 390,000 cases and 121 deaths.

CHICCODODIFC/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

A group of advocates working on education, health care, trauma prevention and early intervention for young children has launched a new campaign to encourage investing in programs earlier than ever before.

When it comes to global health, the world has made remarkable strides over the past two decades. There has been unprecedented progress vaccinating kids, treating diseases and lifting millions out of poverty. The childhood death rate has been slashed in half since 2000. Adults are living an average 5 1/2 years longer.

ccf.georgetown.edu

A new report from Georgetown University shows the number of uninsured Ohio children rose by 28 percent from 2016 to 2018. 

Nearly half a million more children were uninsured in 2018 than in 2017, according to data out Tuesday from the U.S. Census Bureau. The drop stems primarily from a decline in the number of children covered by public programs such programs as Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program.

After years of steady decline, the number of U.S. children without health insurance rose by 276,000 in 2017, according to a Georgetown University report released Thursday.