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Coal-fired Power Plant Emissions

President Trump used the pomp and circumstance of the East Room, complete with an entrance to "Hail to the Chief" and a bevy of supportive Cabinet members, to tout "America's Environmental Leadership" on Monday. There was no new policy announcement. In fact, the event felt mostly like a campaign rally. But it may amount to recognition that the environment and climate change are a growing concern for U.S. voters and an issue on which Democrats hold an edge.

Updated at 3:11 p.m. ET

President Trump has thrown his latest lifeline to the ailing coal industry, significantly weakening one of former President Barack Obama's key policies to address climate change.

The Environmental Protection Agency released the final version of its Affordable Clean Energy rule on Wednesday. It's supported by the coal industry, but it is not clear that it will be enough to stop more coal-fired power plants from closing.

Pollution, much like wealth, is not distributed equally in the United States.

Scientists and policymakers have long known that black and Hispanic Americans tend to live in neighborhoods with more pollution of all kinds, than white Americans. And because pollution exposure can cause a range of health problems, this inequity could be a driver of unequal health outcomes across the U.S.

In his latest effort to boost the coal business — and in the process help a major supporter — President Trump has called on the Tennessee Valley Authority to, essentially, ignore the advice of its staff and keep a large coal-fired power plant operating.

The move has drawn extra scrutiny because that plant buys coal from a company headed by a large campaign donor to Trump, Murray Energy Corp. Chairman, President and CEO Robert Murray.

In another proposed reversal of an Obama-era standard, the Environmental Protection Agency Friday said limiting mercury and other toxic emissions from coal- and oil-fired power plants is not cost-effective and should not be considered "appropriate and necessary."

The EPA says it is keeping the 2012 restrictions in place for now, in large part because utilities have already spent billions to comply with them. But environmental groups worry the move is a step toward repealing the limits and could make it harder to impose other regulations in the future.

The Trump administration plans to eliminate an Obama-era requirement that new coal-fired power plants have expensive technology to capture carbon dioxide emissions.

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After years in limbo, a plan to build a new coal-fired plant in the state has been scrapped. 

For the third consecutive year, Franklin County's air quality gets a failing grade.

Many utility companies and other businesses are critical of the Obama administration's recently-announced goal of cutting carbon emissions from power plants by 30 percent from 2005 levels over the next 16 years.

Ohio groups are sounding off in reaction to President Obama’s call for reduced carbon emissions from new power plants.

A report by an environmental group ranks Ohio second in the nation for the amount of carbon dioxide emitted by coal-fired power plants.

Akron-based FirstEnergy plans to close two coal-fired power plants in Pennsylvania rather than install 270 million dollars worth of pollution control equipment to meet tougher federal mercury emission standards. 

A physician and advocate for clean air is in Cleveland today to talk with college students about the adverse health effects of emissions from coal-fired power plants.