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Covid-19 Deaths

Two new peer-reviewed studies are showing a sharp drop in mortality among hospitalized COVID-19 patients. The drop is seen in all groups, including older patients and those with underlying conditions, suggesting that physicians are getting better at helping patients survive their illness.

Ohio continues to mark more grim records with the highest daily count since the beginning of the pandemic - 2,039 in the past 24-hours.

During this pandemic, people in the United States are dying at rates unparalleled elsewhere in the world.

A new report in the Journal of the American Medical Association finds that in the past five months, per capita deaths in the U.S., both from COVID-19 and other causes, have been far greater than in 18 other high-income countries.

"It's shocking. It's horrible," says Dr. Ezekiel J. Emanuel, a professor of health policy and medical ethics at the University of Pennsylvania and one of the authors of the study.

Data gathered early in the pandemic showed that communities of color are disproportionately affected by COVID-19 across the United States. But incomplete data left a muddy picture of these disparities.

Today, as the U.S. has surpassed 200,000 COVID-19 deaths, and reached nearly 7 million confirmed cases, racial data is more complete, and the trend is crystal clear: People of color get sick and die of COVID-19 at rates higher than whites and higher than their share of the population.

Ohio Department of health

State health officials reported 1,001 new cases of COVID-19 in the past 24-hours, in keeping with the three week average.  

fcmcclerk.com

A Franklin County judge has died of complications from COVID-19.  

The U.S. now has more than 5 million cases and 166,700 deaths from the coronavirus. And with flu season approaching, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned this week that things could get a lot more grim.

Robert Redfield said in an interview Wednesday with WebMD that if Americans don't follow public health guidance, the country could be facing "the worst fall, from a public health perspective, we've ever had."

Black Americans are becoming infected with the coronavirus at a rate three times that of whites and they are twice as likely to die from COVID-19, according to a new report from the National Urban League, based partly on data from Johns Hopkins University.

A key focus of Thursday's report is the impact of the pandemic and how the disease has followed the contours of the larger society in falling especially hard on Blacks, Latinos and Indigenous people.

On a previous episode: “Nursing in Ohio on Nightingale's Birthday,” dedicated to the life of Bernard Atta, we discussed the dangerous conditions prison employees have endured during the COVID-19 pandemic which led to the deaths of Atta and others.

 

Ohio Department of Health

The Ohio Department of Health COVID-19 numbers continue to show increases.  

The total number of cases since the pandemic began is 51,789 -- 743 in the past 24 hours.  Hospitalizations and ICU admissions also continue to rise.  

George Floyd’s murder on Memorial Day weekend at the hands of Minneapolis officer Derick Chauvin and his three supporting officers has re-engergized the Black Lives Matter movement. While police brutality is the movement's central focus, addressing broader health disparities is a critical part of racial justice.

Newly released data from the U.S. government show that nearly 26,000 nursing home residents have died from COVID-19 and more than 60,000 have fallen ill. These figures, however, don't account for all nursing homes across the country.

According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, known as CMS, about 80% of nursing homes nationwide reported data to the CDC as is now required. The remaining 20% could face fines if they don't comply.

Ohio Public Radio

More than three quarters of confirmed COVID-19 deaths in Ohio have come from nursing homes.

Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction

A fourth state prison guard has died from COVID-19.  

John Minchello / Associated Press

Flags are at half staff at state buildings in Columbus and across Muskingum County in honor of Columbus-native Annie Glenn, who died this morning at a nursing home in Minnesota of COVID-19 related causes.  She was 100.

More than 82,000 people in the United States have died of COVID-19 as of Tuesday. How many more lives will be lost? Scientists have built dozens of computational models to answer that question. But the profusion of forecasts poses a challenge: The models use such a wide range of methodologies, formats and time frames that it's hard to get even a ballpark sense of what the future has in store.