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defunding Planned Parenthood

Ohio Public Radio

Planned Parenthood says it will no longer provide birth control, HIV and STD testing and other health services with federal money known as Title X funds.

Updated at 5:37 p.m. ET

Planned Parenthood is leaving the federal Title X family planning program rather than comply with new Trump administration rules regarding abortion counseling.

The new rules, issued by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services earlier this year, prohibit Title X grantees from providing or referring patients for abortion, except in cases of rape, incest or medical emergency.

Planned Parenthood clinics nationwide have stopped using federal Title X family planning funds, according to the organization. The decision comes after the Trump administration announced this week that it has started enforcing regulations that prohibit Title X grant recipients from counseling patients about abortion.

AP Photo/Cliff Owen

The Ohio Department of Health is ending grants and contracts that send money to Planned Parenthood after a divided federal appeals court upheld a state anti-abortion law that blocks public money for the group.

Planned Parenthood officials are voicing outrage against the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati's ruling upholding a state law that blocks public funding for the organization. 

The Trump administration has issued its final draft of a rule that makes sweeping changes to Title X, the federal program that provides birth control and other reproductive health services to millions of low-income Americans.

With a newly configured U.S. Supreme Court, the stakes are high for abortion-rights battles at the state level. Abortion-rights advocates and opponents are preparing for a busy year — from a tug-of-war over Roe v. Wade to smaller efforts that could expand or restrict access to abortion.

The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati has blocked an Ohio law that tried to divert public money from Planned Parenthood in an anti-abortion push by GOP lawmakers. 

cleveland.com

A Cleveland banker and Republican Party donor reports raising 250 thousand dollars in his U.S. Senate campaign's first 24 hours, even as he scrambles to clarify his abortion stance.

Some new bills at the Statehouse would make abortion illegal at earlier stages of pregnancy than existing law, which bans abortion after around 24 weeks.