Listen

E.Coli

wcpo.com

Cincinnati-based Kroger has pulled from its shelves the Private Selection brand of triple berry medley and blackberries due to hepatitis A concerns.  

abc.news.go.com

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says 196 people in ten states, including a dozen in Ohio, have contracted e-coli from tainted ground beef. 

abc.news.go.com

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says ground beef is the likely source of an E.Coli outbreak that has sickened more than 100 people in Ohio and five other states. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has added Ohio to its list of five states where an E. coli outbreak has been declared. 

Giant Eagle stores in central Ohio are recalling red-leaf and green-leaf lettuce because of the risk of E. coli contamination. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has traced an ongoing E. coli outbreak to romaine lettuce grown in the Central Coastal region of California.

Lettuce from other parts of the U.S. and Mexico is safe to eat, the CDC says. However, if you're not sure where your romaine lettuce came from, err on the side of caution and throw it out, health experts say.

A total of 43 people in 12 states have been infected in this outbreak. No deaths have been reported.

Cut Caesar salad off the menu this week: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says a multistate E. coli outbreak is underway, and romaine lettuce is to blame.

Thirty-two people are sick, including 13 who were hospitalized; no deaths have been reported. An additional 18 people were sickened in Canada.

Evidence points toward romaine lettuce as the likely source, but the CDC can't get more specific than that.

The illnesses started appearing in late March. Here and there, across the country, people were checking themselves in to hospitals, sick from toxic E. coli bacteria. At least 200 people got sick. Five of them died.

livescience.com

Delaware County health officials say state testing of food samples from a Chipotle restaurant in Powell turned up negative for harmful bacteria. 

Getty Images

Delaware County health officials say the first batch of stool samples taken from people who got sick at a Chipotle restaurant in Powell tested negative for Salmonella, Shigella, E.coli and Norovirus. 

An E. coli outbreak that sickened people in 36 states and triggered warnings not to eat romaine lettuce this spring has been traced to water in a canal in the Yuma, Ariz., region – and the outbreak is now officially over, federal officials say.

"Suspect product is no longer being harvested or distributed from this area and is no longer available in stores or restaurants, due to its 21-day shelf life," the Food and Drug Administration says.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is still advising people not to eat romaine lettuce unless they know where it was grown.

It appears the outbreak of E. coli bacteria, which began in March, linked to romaine lettuce grown in Arizona is over, but investigators still aren't exactly sure what caused one of the worst outbreaks of its kind in recent years. More than 120 people have been reported ill in more than two dozen states, and at least one person has died.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expanded its warning to consumers Friday to stay away from all types of romaine lettuce grown in the Yuma, Ariz., region because of an E. coli outbreak that has infected at least 61 people in 16 states.

The agency had previously instructed people not to eat chopped and bagged romaine lettuce from the area. But the new warning includes whole heads of romaine in addition to all of the packaged products.

Tainted, chopped romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Ariz., is the source of an E. coli outbreak that has sickened at least 53 people in 16 states, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

foodpoisonjournal.com

The U.S. Department of Agriculture says Ohio Farms Packing Company is recalling more than 40 thousand pounds of  boneless veal products for possible E. coli contamination.

tripadvisor.com

Mount Vernon city officials are considering a plan to open a public park for goose hunting.

State officials say children, the elderly and those with a weak immune system should avoid swimming in the water at Madison Lake in Madison County because of elevated E. Coli levels. 

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources has issued water warnings for Delaware and Alum Creek Reservoirs, saying E. Coli contamination could pose health risks to swimmers, particularly the elderly, children and those with weak immune systems.

E.Coli Found At Two Buckeye Lake Beaches

Jul 16, 2014
Ohio Environmental Protection Agency

The Ohio Department of Health says levels of E.Coli bacteria at two Buckeye lake beaches are unsafe.

National Institutes of Health

Researchers at Ohio State and Harvard Universities say they are on the cusp of a breakthrough in fighting E. coli and other drug-resistant bacteria.

wikipedia

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency says water in the Upper Scioto Watershed contains unsafe levels of E.coli.