Listen

Hate Groups

Twenty-one Utah-based white supremacists have been indicted on drug and firearms charges, according to the U.S. Justice Department. The move comes just days after alleged white supremacist gang members in Texas, Kentucky and Mississippi were brought up on similar charges.

Updated at 7:06 p.m. ET

The FBI says it has thwarted a plot by militia members to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, and six people are facing federal charges. In a coordinated move, Michigan is pursuing state felony charges against seven people with ties to a militia called the Wolverine Watchmen.

In a statement early Thursday, Whitmer said two militia groups "were preparing to kidnap and possibly kill me."

Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

President Donald Trump didn't distance himself from hate groups  Tuesday night in Cleveland.  But Ohio governor Mike DeWine has.  

Montgomery County has cited threats to public health and safety in denying a permit application by a Ku Klux Klan group that wanted to hold another rally in Dayton. 

Getty Images

A group with ties to the Ku Klux Klan is planning a second rally in Dayton.  

Burke Family

An Athens man has won a 5 thousand dollar judgment against former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke as part of a lawsuit against white supremacists and neo-Nazi protesters. 

newsweek.com

Stickers with the words  "It's Okay To Be White" have been found at Binns Elementary School and Crossroads United Methodist Church.  

Police have arrested three men in northern Georgia who are suspected of belonging to a violent white supremacist group called The Base, saying that they were plotting to commit murder and that they belonged to a criminal street gang.

They're the second trio of suspected Base members to be arrested this week; the FBI announced Thursday that it arrested three other men in Maryland.

Fearing potential violence, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam is declaring a state of emergency and is banning firearms and other weapons on the Capitol grounds in Richmond ahead of a gun rights demonstration planned for next week.

"We have received credible intelligence from our law enforcement agencies that there are groups with malicious plans for the rally that is planned for Monday," Northam said during a press conference Wednesday afternoon.

Liz Sines happened to be near campus that night, so she was among the first to see the hundreds of young men who stormed the University of Virginia lawn. They marched in the darkness, tiki torches illuminating their faces as they chanted ugly slurs: "Jews will not replace us!"

Local leaders and activists are condemning an event that took place over the weekend on Sawmill Road by members of the group the Proud Boys.  

For the picturesque college town of Durham in southeastern New Hampshire, a reckoning came in 2017.

That was the year a complaint about the cultural appropriation of Cinco de Mayo spiraled into weeks of racial unrest, a boiling over of tensions that had simmered for years at the University of New Hampshire. Students who called out racist incidents faced a backlash of online bullying, swastikas and slurs, and the vandalism of sculptures that symbolized their cause.

The alleged leader of an armed militia group that has intercepted and detained migrant families along the southern border in New Mexico was charged with federal firearms offenses on Monday.

Larry Mitchell Hopkins, 69, of Flora Vista, N.M., appeared in federal court in Las Cruces after his arrest on Saturday on charges of illegally possessing firearms as a felon.

Facebook announced Wednesday that it intends to ban content that glorifies white nationalism and separatism, a major policy shift that will begin next week.

"It's clear that these concepts are deeply linked to organized hate groups and have no place on our services," the company said in a statement.

At first, you might not realize the flyer was put there by a white supremacy group.

The poster, in shades of black, white and teal, features Andrew Jackson on horseback. The accompanying text reads: "European roots, American greatness."

twitter.com

Democratic U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown of Ohio is asking the FBI to release information on domestic terrorist organizations or hate groups operating in the state.

Ohio Public Radio

Democratic state lawmakers are supporting a new bill officially denouncing white nationalists and neo-Nazis.