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National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

NOAA's top scientist said Monday that he's investigating why the agency's leadership endorsed President Trump's false tweet that Alabama was in the path of Hurricane Dorian, after Birmingham-based meteorologists from the National Weather Service publicly pushed back on it.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration researchers are warning another large toxic algae bloom will spread across western Lake Erie later this summer. 

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says heavy rains this spring make it more likely western Lake Erie will see another significant algae bloom later this year. 

2018 was a hot year — in fact, the fourth warmest on record. The only years that were, on average, warmer were the past three, according to the World Meteorological Organization.

It has been warming for decades now. But 2018 brought several major new and markedly more precise reports from scientists about what climate change is doing to the weather and how dire they expect the consequences to be.

That didn't stop President Trump and others from continuing to question the evidence.

bpvcrc.osu.edu

A local task force today is submitting a list of 43 recommendations to Columbus City Council and Mayor Andy Ginther on helping the region prepare for the effects of global climate change.  

The Arctic has experienced the "most unprecedented transition in history" in terms of warming temperatures and melting ice, and those changes may be the cause of extreme weather around the globe, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's 2018 Arctic Report Card.

Lake Erie's algae bloom season is over for the year - and it wasn't as bad as scientists had expected. 

noaa.org

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says central Ohio should experience a milder than normal winter this season.  

NOAA has released the latest State of the Climate report, its annual checkup on our planet.

So, how did Earth fare in 2017?

Greenhouse gases in the atmosphere: record highs. Global surface temperature: near-record high. Sea surface temperature: near-record high. Global sea level: highest on record.

ecowatch.com

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration researchers are forecasting a smaller algae bloom in the western Lake Erie basin this summer than last. 

bpvcrc.osu.edu

A task force led by Ohio State University researchers has released a draft action plan to help central Ohio prepare for climate change. 

This past year, 2017, was among the warmest years on record, according to new data released by NASA and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration.

The planet's global surface temperature last year was the second highest since 1880, NASA says. NOAA calls it the third warmest year on record, because of slight variations in the ways that they analyze temperatures.

Both put 2017 behind 2016's record temperatures. And "both analyses show that the five warmest years on record have all taken place since 2010," NASA said in a press release.

The Arctic is a huge, icy cap on the planet that acts like a global air conditioner. But the air conditioner is breaking down, according to scientists who issued a grim "report card" on the Arctic on Tuesday.

They say the North Pole continues to warm at an alarming pace — twice the rate as the rest of the planet, on average. This year was the Arctic's second-warmest in at least 1,500 years, after 2016.

Researchers say the toxic algae on Lake Erie this year roughly matched the third-most severe bloom over the past 15 years.

This winter is going to be a warm one for the majority of the United States, according to forecasters at NOAA's Climate Prediction Center.

They say that the La Niña weather pattern is likely to develop. That means "greater-than-average snowfall around the Great Lakes and in the northern Rockies, with less-than-average snowfall throughout the Mid-Atlantic region," Mike Halpert of the Climate Prediction Center said in a forecast Thursday.

The first algae forecast by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration indicates a slightly greater risk for blooms to form in Lake Erie this year as compared with last year. 

University and government researchers are predicting the toxic algae bloom in the western basin of Lake Erie this summer will be considerably smaller than in recent years.

Scientists say an algae bloom that spread across Lake Erie this past summer was the largest on record and produced a thick scum about the size of New York City. 

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration researchers say Lake Erie could see one of the most severe outbreaks of toxic algae blooms this summer.

Federal researchers are developing an early warning system for toxic algae blooms.

Illinois EPA

Researchers predict Lake Erie will have a significant bloom of toxic blue-green algae in its western basin this summer but say it won't be as large as last year or the record-setting 2011 outbreak.

blogs.woodtv.com

The Great Lakes are now ice free.