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President Trump went before cameras on Monday in highly anticipated remarks following the mass shootings in Ohio and Texas over the weekend. In his remarks at the White House, Trump used the words "domestic terrorism" and "white supremacy." He did not acknowledge his own rhetoric.

The president targeted violent video games and drew a connection between mass shootings and mental health, though the research does not back up his assertions.

Beachwood police are investigating a poster denying the Holocaust that was placed on a sign outside a Jewish museum last week. 

cnn.com

A magistrate judge has recommended the publisher of a Worthington-based neo-Nazi website pay the victim of an internet trolling campaign more than 14 million dollars and remove all posts that encouraged his readers to contact the Montana real estate agent. 

Avowed neo-Nazi James Fields Jr. was given a second sentence of life in prison for killing a woman and injuring dozens when he rammed his car into a group of people protesting a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., in 2017.

On Monday, Charlottesville Circuit Judge Richard Moore sentenced Fields to the life term plus 419 years and $480,000 in fines, in keeping with a jury's recommendation.

Updated at 6:32 p.m. ET

The man who drove his car into a crowd of anti-racist protesters in Charlottesville, Va., killing one person and injuring 35 has been sentenced to spending the rest of his life in prison.

A federal judge issued the sentence of life without the possibility of parole on Friday for self-proclaimed neo-Nazi James Fields Jr., 22, of the Toledo, Ohio, area.

cnn.com

A Montana woman estimates she will have lost at least 1.3 million dollars as the result of a Worthington-based neo-Nazi website publisher telling his followers to unleash an anti-Semitic "troll storm" against her in 2016. 

deanofradio.com

A federal judge has awarded 4.1 million dollars to a Muslim-American radio host who accused the operator of a Worthington-based neo-Nazi website of falsely accusing him of terrorism. 

Burke Family

An Athens man is suing white supremacists and neo-Nazi protesters in federal court, saying he was severely injured during their rally in Charlottesville, Virginia two years ago. 

deanofradio.com

A federal judge has ruled a Muslim-American radio host may recover monetary damages from the publisher of a Worthington-based neo-Nazi website who falsely accused him of terrorism.

Before going on a shooting spree at the Chabad of Poway synagogue in Southern California, the alleged perpetrator posted a letter on the website 8chan. It echoes last month's New Zealand shootings, in which the alleged perpetrator took to 8chan to announce the attacks on mosques in Christchurch.

randazza.com

Attorneys for the operator of  a Worthington-based neo-Nazi website intend to withdraw from representing him in a lawsuit over an anti-Semitic "troll storm" that terrorized a Montana real estate agent's family. 

wikipedia

The publisher of a Worthington-based neo-Nazi website says he refuses to return to the U.S. to be deposed in a lawsuit accusing him of unleashing an anti-Semitic "troll storm" against a Montana real estate agent's family. 

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The Maumee man convicted on state murder charges in Virginia for the deadly car attack at a 2017 white nationalist rally in Charlottesville has pleaded guilty to federal hate crime charges. 

Facebook announced Wednesday that it intends to ban content that glorifies white nationalism and separatism, a major policy shift that will begin next week.

"It's clear that these concepts are deeply linked to organized hate groups and have no place on our services," the company said in a statement.

A group of civil rights and faith leaders are demanding a meeting with FBI Director Christopher Wray in the wake of the New Zealand terror attacks that killed at least 50 people as they prayed in mosques. The killer was a white nationalist who named President Trump as an inspiration in his online racist screed.

The groups want the FBI to address "the threat to public safety" and to their communities "by white nationalist violence."

Authorities are looking into whether the suspect in last week's terror attack on two mosques in New Zealand was inspired by an emerging, European-based breed of white nationalism. The identitarian movement, formed in France in 2016, broadly believes that white people in Europe and North America are being displaced by non-European immigrants.

Experts who monitor hate groups say the attacks on Friday at the mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, follow a sharp rise in violent white extremism around the globe and especially in the United States.

"They operate in an ideological world of people that reinforce each other's ideas but may never actually meet each other in person," says Kathy Blee of the University of Pittsburgh, who studies white extremism.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

I want to bring in another voice here. It is Ben Collins, who reports on online extremism for NBC News.

Hi there, Ben.

BEN COLLINS: Hey. How you doing?

wikipedia

The operator of a Worthington-based neo-Nazi website claims it's too dangerous for him to travel to the U.S. for a deposition in a lawsuit accusing him of terrorizing a Montana real estate agent's family.

At first, you might not realize the flyer was put there by a white supremacy group.

The poster, in shades of black, white and teal, features Andrew Jackson on horseback. The accompanying text reads: "European roots, American greatness."

A series of photos featuring a group of teenagers crowded around a swastika made of red plastic cups – laughing, toasting and Sieg Heiling over the Nazi symbol – is shaking swaths of predominantly white and affluent communities across Orange County, Calif., where at least some of the teens are enrolled in high school.

deanofradio.com

A Muslim-American satellite radio host is asking a federal court to award him more than 1 million dollars in damages for his claims that a Worthington-based neo-Nazi website operator falsely accused him of terrorism. 

splcenter.org

Many Circleville residents say they are upset about the circulation of anti-immigrant fliers by a white supremacy group. 

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

Pressure mounted on Iowa GOP Rep. Steve King on Tuesday as a top House Republican leader called on him to resign over his recent comments to The New York Times on white supremacy.

"We do not support it or agree with it, and as I said I think he should find another line of work," House GOP Conference Chairwoman Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., told reporters Tuesday morning.

Updated at 2:11 a.m. ET Tuesday

House Republican leaders moved Monday to remove Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, from two committees as a punishment for his recent comments in a New York Times interview where he was quoted questioning why the terms "white nationalist" and "white supremacist" are considered offensive.

Hamilton County Sheriff's Office

An Ohio man was sentenced Monday to just under four years in prison for his role in the beating of a black man the day of a white nationalist rally in Virginia.

torchantifa.org

An internet troll who harassed a black college student with racist messages on social media has reached a settlement requiring him to get sensitivity training, publicly apologize and renounce white supremacy. 

The 21-year-old avowed neo-Nazi who murdered a woman when he plowed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters last year at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., will likely spend the rest of his life in prison.

A jury in Charlottesville said Tuesday that James Alex Fields Jr. should be sentenced to life plus 419 years in prison and $480,000 in fines, for killing Heather Heyer and seriously injuring 35 others.

Judge Richard Moore will decide whether to sign off on the recommended sentence at a hearing on March 29.

Updated at 7:07 p.m. ET

James Alex Fields Jr., who rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters during a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., last year was found guilty on Friday of killing Heather Heyer and injuring dozens of others.

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