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Roe v. Wade

What is the current state of abortion access in Ohio, and what does the future hold? On the new episode of Prognosis Ohio, host Dan Skinner talks with Professor B. Jessie Hill, JD, who is Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development and Judge Ben C. Green Professor of Law at Case Western Reserve University’s School of Law.

Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

Supporters of legal abortion stormed the Ohio Senate to send a message to lawmakers about restrictions on the procedure, and specifically about a bill set to be considered tomorrow. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports.

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett has, like many of the recent nominees before her, been unwilling to tip her hand as to how she might rule on potential high-profile cases if confirmed to the high court.

But she also has left some hints as to her leanings, especially on the topic of abortion rights. As a University of Notre Dame Law School professor, Barrett signed an ad that stated, "It's time to put an end to the barbaric legacy of Roe v. Wade," referring to the landmark 1973 Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion nationwide.

Associated Press

Ohio anti-abortion activists are using the nomination of conservative Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court to again reintroduce a bill that would ban all abortions if the Roe v. Wade ruling is overturned. 

Ohio Public Radio

A new bill that would ban abortion  in Ohio has been introduced by two GOP lawmakers in the Ohio House. 

Ohio Public Radio

A new bill in the state legislature outlaws all abortions and subjects medical professionals who facilitate them to possible murder charges. 

Three-quarters of Americans say they want to keep in place the landmark Supreme Court ruling, Roe v. Wade, that made abortion legal in the United States, but a strong majority would like to see restrictions on abortion rights, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll.

Sam Aberle

Supporters of legal abortion rallied in state capitals throughout the nation earlier today, including at the Ohio Statehouse.

twitter.com

Democratic U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown of Ohio attacked the increasingly restrictive climate surrounding women's reproductive issues this week.  

Sam Aberle

More than a month after Governor Mike DeWine signed one of the most restrictive abortion bans in the country, a lawsuit has been filed in federal court to stop it from taking effect in July.

The new anti-abortion tilt of the U.S. Supreme Court has inspired some states to further restrict the procedure during the first trimester of pregnancy and move to outlaw abortion entirely if Roe v. Wade ever falls. But the rush to regulate has exposed division among groups and lawmakers who consider themselves staunch abortion opponents.

SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Ohio’s newest law that bans abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected is supposed to go into effect in three months.

With a newly configured U.S. Supreme Court, the stakes are high for abortion-rights battles at the state level. Abortion-rights advocates and opponents are preparing for a busy year — from a tug-of-war over Roe v. Wade to smaller efforts that could expand or restrict access to abortion.

Statehouse News Bureau

Ohio has moved again to impose some of the most far-reaching abortion restrictions in the nation, after Republican Governor John Kasich signed a ban Friday on dilation and evacuation terminations and set up a showdown with lawmakers over his veto of the so-called heartbeat bill.

Three-quarters of Americans think the Supreme Court should not overturn the landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that made abortion legal nationwide, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds.

But that result includes a degree of nuance.

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Public opinion on abortion rights is often framed as a binary choice between two political positions, but a closer look at new polling data from Gallup reveals more nuance.

While a majority of Americans support legalized abortion in early pregnancy, most oppose it in the later stages, according to the survey.

cleveland.com

A Cleveland banker and Republican Party donor reports raising 250 thousand dollars in his U.S. Senate campaign's first 24 hours, even as he scrambles to clarify his abortion stance.