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A new effort is underway to expand access to support and resources for domestic violence survivors in Ohio during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

A conservative think tank has filed a lawsuit against the City of Columbus and the state of Ohio, claiming that its employees who live outside of Columbus shouldn’t have paid city income taxes while working during the state’s stay at home order.

Updated at 10:47 p.m. ET

As the number of new coronavirus cases surges each day in many parts of the country, some states are hitting pause on their plans to reopen.

Ohio Department of Health

Governor Mike DeWine says the state as a whole has seen a steady decrease in cases of COVID-19.

An NPR survey of state health departments shows that the national coronavirus contact tracing workforce has tripled in the past six weeks, from 11,142 workers to 37,110. Yet given their current case counts, only seven states and the District of Columbia are staffed to the level that public health researchers say is needed to contain outbreaks.

Across the country, states are loosening the restrictions that had been put in place to curb the spread of COVID-19 — with varying results.

Ohio Department of Health

Interim Ohio Department of Health Director Lance Himes has signed an order allowing county fairs and animal exhibitions to re-open from COVID-19 closures with strict safety standards in place. 

Just weeks after parts of the U.S. began reopening, coronavirus infections are on the upswing in several states, including Arizona, Utah, Texas and Florida. Dramatic increases in daily case counts have given rise to some unsettling questions: Is the U.S. at the start of a second wave? Have states reopened too soon? And have the recent widespread demonstrations against racial injustice inadvertently added fuel to the fire?

Texas reported a record-breaking number of COVID-19 hospitalizations Monday as the governor plans to reopen more businesses and double capacity.

AP Photo/Tony Dejak

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine says casinos, amusement parks and racetracks will be allowed to reopen June 19.  

ohiosenate.gov

The Ohio Senate has rejected a house-passed measure to limit the powers of the governor and state health director in issuing health orders. 

The gradual lifting of coronavirus restrictions is expected to cause the number of cases in Ohio to rise according to projections from MetroHealth System in Cleveland. 

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine says the state is shifting to a new phase in the battle against the coronavirus, moving from state orders to strong recommendations.  

Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

Republicans in the Ohio House have approved a bill that would limit the power and length of public health orders on coronavirus that their fellow Republican, Gov. Mike DeWine, has been issuing through Ohio Department of Health Director Dr. Amy Acton. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports the bill reflects a split in the GOP on how to restart the economy that could carry over into the future.

State leaders are considering reopening economies and allowing people to leave their homes, but more and more Americans appear to be doing so on their own.

Emerging data suggest that though people dramatically altered their habits to stay at home during the first month of America's response to the pandemic, that cooperation has since leveled off and — eventually — decreased. This could point to long-term challenges for state governments asking citizens to cooperate with extended stay-at-home policies.

Ohio's "Stay at Home" order has been extended to May 29, and is being rebranded as "Stay Safe Ohio". 

Associated Press

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine says the state's stay-at-home order that was set to expire today will be extended until May 29.

Columbus police have cited a woman for violating the ban on large gatherings after she allegedly hosted a large party on Monday night. 

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The owner of a Columbus restaurant says he will open on May 1st, despite state orders to remain closed. 

Ohio University health policy professor Dan Skinner interviews Duana Patton, CEO of the Ohio District 5 Area Agency on Aging, a private nonprofit serving 9 counties in North Central Ohio. 

LISTEN TO THE EPISODE ON SOUND CLOUD.

Ohiochannel.org

Small business leaders throughout the state are telling a House panel looking at how to lift Ohio’s Stay Home order they need to allow businesses to open now. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles has details.

Ohio Public Radio

Protestors marched down High Street and gathered outside the Statehouse today during Governor DeWine's afternoon coronavirus briefing. 

wikipedia

Columbus police and Ohio State University are now jointly enforcing bans on public gatherings near campus. 

United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres, citing a sharp rise in domestic violence amid global coronavirus lockdowns, called on governments around the world to make addressing the issue a key part of their response to the pandemic.

Speaking late Sunday, Guterres said "violence is not confined to the battlefield."

"For many women and girls, the threat looms largest where they should be safest — in their own homes," he said, appealing "for peace at home — and in homes — around the world."

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A Hamilton County judge has ordered the organizer of a block party in Over-the-Rhine be held without bond.  

hometownstations.com

The expanded stay-at-home order in Ohio includes new provisions for businesses and residents. 

Ohioans will have to practice social distancing through the month of April.

Dan Skinner talks with two Ohio medical students about uncertainty, both about their present training during the State at Home order, and how medicine is being changed by the COVID19 coronavirus pandemic. Wende Oslock (@WendelynOslock) is a 3rd year medical student at Ohio State University who plans to practice general surgery when she graduates. David Strawhun (@strawhberry1) is a 3rd year medical student at Ohio University who hopes to practice family medicine when he graduates. 

While many businesses have been closed by state order in the last 10 days, "essential" businesses have been able to remain open.  State officials are asking businesses to self-police.

Andy Chow

Ohio's Stay At Home order is now in effect and many non-essential businesses are closed. However, there are still a number of businesses that remain open which could be raising concerns for workers. State officials say there are measures in place to empower employees.