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U.S. Census Bureau

Updated Nov. 2, 7:50 p.m. ET

The Supreme Court has refused to postpone the start of the first trial over the controversial citizenship question it added to the 2020 census.

The Trump administration is fending off six lawsuits across the country over a citizenship question that has been added to the 2020 census for, officials insist, one primary reason — to get better data on who in the country is and isn't a U.S. citizen.

Updated 6:25 p.m. ET Friday

The Supreme Court has temporarily shielded Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross from having to sit for questioning under oath in the lawsuits over a controversial citizenship question the Trump administration added to the 2020 census.

Updated 10:33 p.m. ET

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has temporarily blocked lower court orders for depositions by two senior Trump administration officials in the multiple lawsuits over the new question about U.S. citizenship status on the 2020 census.

Updated September 14

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and his staff prepared to embark on a legal fight that would take them to the highest court in the U.S. long before announcing the controversial decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census.

The Trump administration has lost another round in its efforts to get courts to dismiss lawsuits challenging the citizenship question it added to the 2020 census.

On Friday, U.S. District Judge Richard Seeborg issued an order allowing two cases filed at San Francisco federal court to continue.

The legal fight over the controversial citizenship question on the 2020 census is likely to continue at San Francisco federal court.

"I believe the case will proceed," U.S. District Judge Richard Seeborg said Friday during a hearing on whether to dismiss two of the lawsuits against the Census Bureau and the Commerce Department, which oversees the census.

Months before the Justice Department submitted a formal request for a citizenship question, pressure to add one to the 2020 census was mounting from a powerful decision-maker behind the national head count: Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross.

Updated at 2:05 p.m. ET

Editor's Note: This story contains a vulgar word.

A federal judge in Manhattan has ruled that the largest of the six lawsuits against the new citizenship question on the 2020 census can move forward in court.

Updated at 12:54 p.m. ET, July 27

The U.S. Census Bureau has stopped plans to form a new committee of advisers for the upcoming 2020 census, according to a letter obtained by NPR.

The decision comes as the agency prepares for the once-a-decade head count of every person living in the country while battling multiple lawsuits over a new citizenship question and cybersecurity concerns about the first U.S. census to allow all households to respond online. Similar advisory committees were put in place before the national head counts in 2000 and 2010.

Updated at 3 p.m. ET

A few months after he started leading the Commerce Department, Secretary Wilbur Ross became impatient. As a powerful decider for the U.S. census, he had a keen interest in adding a citizenship question to the 2020 census as soon as possible.

The head of the U.S. Census Bureau says the controversy over a new question about U.S. citizenship on the 2020 census is complicating its preparations to conduct a national head count.

For the first time since 1950, the Census Bureau will ask all U.S. households about citizenship status, specifically, "Is this person a citizen of the United States?"

aecf.org

Ohio is ranked 25th in the nation for overall child well-being in the latest Kids Count data book from the non-partisan Annie E. Casey Foundation. 

Mike Foley

The City of Columbus has joined a multi-state lawsuit - led by New York - seeking to block the Trump Administration from adding a citizenship question to the 2020 Census. 

nytimes.com

Today is Equal Pay Day, marking how far into 2018 women have to work to earn the wages of their male counterparts in 2017. 

flickr.com

U.S. Census Bureau estimates show the Columbus metro area now has more people than metro Cleveland and is on pace to surpass Cincinnati at its current rate of growth. 

Ohio Public Radio

State legislative leaders have formed a four-member bipartisan group to work on creating a new way to redraw congressional districts after the 2020 census.

Newly released U.S. Census Bureau data shows median income rose slightly, while poverty rates and the number of people without health insurance in Franklin County and the state declined from 2015 to 2016.

columbusohiophotos.com

The U.S. Census Bureau says Columbus is now the nation's 14th largest city, surpassing Indianapolis.

uc.edu

A University of Cincinnati astrophysicist has created maps showing the racial makeup of the United States.

The U.S. Census Bureau says Franklin County is now Ohio's most populous county.

The U.S. Census Bureau says Ohio's population grew less than 1 percent between July 2015 and the end of 2016.

The U.S. Census Bureau says Delaware County is the fastest growing county in Ohio.

The U.S. Census Bureau says Columbus' population continues to grow.

The U.S. Census Bureau has released figures on the number of Ohioans living in poverty.

Ohio Senate Approves Redistricting Plan

Dec 12, 2014
ideastream.org

A bipartisan redistrict agreement is awaiting Ohio House approval after the Senate passed the measure early this morning. 

Census Bureau: More Ohioans Insured Under ACA

Sep 18, 2014

The U.S. Census Bureau says the number of Ohioans without health insurance fell by 47 thousand during the past year.

Columbus Fastest Growing Ohio City

May 22, 2014

New U.S. Census Bureau estimates show Columbus has been the fastest growing large city in Ohio over the past three years.

The U.S. Census Bureau says two central Ohio counties led the state in births last year.

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