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Vaccines

Agency Coordinates Free Child Care For COVID Vaccinations

Jun 24, 2021

Local child care providers are joining the national push to get more adults vaccinated.

The list of Ohioans who will be eligible for COVID-19 vaccines still doesn’t include cancer patients.

News regarding vaccines seems to change everyday: new vaccines coming online from more sources, new age groups and professions approved for appointments, new reports about our neighbors who are wary of getting a shot, and updates about variants of the virus. Our panel will discuss these topics surrounding the conversation about COVID vaccines.

OSU Medical Center Twitter

Ohio’s nursing home residents and workers are among the first in the state to be offered the new COVID-19 vaccines.

columbus.gov/publichealth

Columbus Public Health has opened a new drive-thru seasonal flu shot clinic at the Celeste Center on the Ohio State Fairgrounds Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. with no out-of-pocket costs.  

Ohio Department of Health

Governor Mike DeWine says - given the latest numbers released by the Ohio Department of Health - the rest of 2020 may be rough.

Updated at 7:05 p.m. ET

Facebook said on Tuesday it will ban anti-vaccination ads, following widespread pressure on the social network to curb harmful content.

Under the new global policy, the company will no longer accept ads discouraging people from getting vaccines; ads that portray vaccines as unsafe or ineffective; or ads claiming the diseases vaccines prevent are harmless.

Updated at 5:38 p.m. ET

Two coronavirus studies have been put on pause by drugmakers as they investigate safety concerns.

The pauses are not uncommon or cause for undue concern, but they highlight how little is known about the combination of medications prescribed to President Trump following his COVID-19 diagnosis.

Johnson & Johnson paused all clinical trials of its experimental COVID-19 vaccine after a study participant became sick with an "unexplained illness."

Every year, Stephen Lim and his colleagues at the University of Washington compile and analyze health data from every country on the planet to come up with a sort of global report card.

Year after year, one of the biggest success stories has been the vaccination of children.

"We've really seen this steady progress in increasing the fraction of children who are receiving ... in particular, the basic vaccines — diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis," Lim says.

Office of Ohio Governor Mike DeWine

State health officials say Coronavirus and influenza could prove a deadly combination this winter. 

NUMSTOCKER, SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Public health leaders say the flu has hit the Buckeye State hard.

After decades of progress against one of the most contagious human viruses, the world is seeing measles stage a slow, steady comeback.

The World Health Organization and the CDC say in a new report that there were nearly 10 million cases of measles last year, with outbreaks on every continent.

An estimated 140,000 people died from measles in 2018, WHO says, up from an all-time low of 90,000 in 2016.

And so far 2019 has been even worse.

Polio Is Making A Comeback

Nov 15, 2019

As the global effort to eradicate polio gets tantalizing close to its goal, the program is running in to new challenges.

One of the biggest obstacles this year is the proliferation of so-called "vaccine-derived" polio outbreaks.

nationalpost.com

A new poll shows most Ohio adults agree children should have the required vaccinations in order to enroll in public school. 

This year saw the largest outbreak of measles in the U.S. since 1994, with 1,250 cases reported as of Oct. 3, largely driven by families choosing not to vaccinate their kids. Worldwide, the disease has resurfaced in areas that had been declared measles-free.

In the incredibly ambitious, multibillion-dollar effort to wipe polio off the face of the planet, there's currently good news and bad news.

The good news, says Michel Zaffran, who runs the World Health Organization's global polio eradication program, is that there's hardly any polio left.

"When we started back in 1988," Zaffran says, "we had cases in 125 countries and 300,000 cases every year."

Ohio Public Radio

Health officials plan to oppose a bill in the Ohio House that would block employers from requiring workers to get vaccines. 

Ohio Public Radio

Prominent attorney Robert F. Kennedy Junior says vaccines are making children sick. 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration just approved one of the most sought after vaccines in recent decades. It's the world's first vaccine to prevent dengue fever — a disease so painful that its nickname is "breakbone fever."

The vaccine, called Dengvaxia, is aimed at helping children in Puerto Rico and other U.S. territories where dengue is a problem.