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M.L. Schultze

M.L. Schultze came to WKSU as news director in July 2007 after 25 years at The Repository in Canton, where she was managing editor for nearly a decade. She’s now the digital editor and an award-winning reporter and analyst who has appeared on NPR, Here and Now and the TakeAway, as well as being a regular panelist on Ideas, the WVIZ public television's reporter roundtable.

Schultze's work includes ongoing reporting on community-police relations; immigration; fracking and extensive state, local and national political coverage. She’s also past president of Ohio Associated Press Media Editors and the Akron Press Club, and remains on the board of both.

A native of the Philadelphia, Pa., area, Schultze graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in magazine journalism and political science. She lives in Canton with her husband, Rick Senften, the retired special projects editor at The Rep and now a specialist working with kids involved in the juvenile courts. Their daughter, Gwen, lives and works in the Washington, D.C.-area with her husband and two sons. Their son, Christopher, lives in Hawaii.

In the two months since the coronavirus first started dominating the headlines of American newspapers, some 1,100 of those newspapers have laif off and furloughed staff, cut pay and print schedules, or gone out of existence altogether.  But as WKSU's M.L. Schultze reports, it's also spawned some new models in Ohio and beyond.

Akron, Ohio, picked a heck of a year to try to put joy back into voting. After all, two-thirds of likely voters in a recent Ohio poll picked "disgust" to describe their attitude towards politics.

Still, with the help of goats, virtual wrestling, and a pickup truck called Percival, a group of joyful voters thinks it can counter that.