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Jo Ingles (Ohio Public Radio)

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Ohio’s hospitals report they are at or near capacity right now because of a surge in COVID patients, as medical professionals overwhelmingly continue to recommend COVID vaccines and masks. Even if the makeshift hospitals set up at the start of the pandemic were stood up again, that won’t solve the problem. There are not enough doctors, nurses and other staff to care for the influx of patients who are trending younger, are sicker, and in nearly all cases, unvaccinated.

Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

Gov. Mike DeWine is launching another effort to boost COVID vaccinations, this time specifically targeting young Ohioans. His new program will give people under 25 an opportunity to win college scholarships for getting COVID shots.

Jo Ingles

Many communities in Ohio have adopted local mask mandates in recent days since a statewide mask mandate is off the table right now.

The Ohio Restaurant Association’s John Barker says COVID itself presents a lot of unknowns. But he says local mask mandates hurt restaurants because they provide another level of uncertainty.

Dan Konik / Statehouse News Bureau

The Ohio Redistricting Commission heard from thousands of Ohioans. Some have written or called lawmakers. And a few hundred have shown up at more than a dozen public hearings to make their voices heard. Some showed up at more than one hearing. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports on what Ohioans are saying.

Ohio Channel

The two Democrats on the seven-member Ohio Redistricting Commission unveiled their revisions to Republican-drawn maps for the House and Senate at the panel’s hearing in suburban Cleveland Monday evening.

Statehouse News Bureau

Members of the panel that will approve new maps for Ohio House and Senate districts were lambasted Sunday by Ohioans who attended a public hearing in Dayton that went on for more than four hours.

Jo Ingles

Last spring, teachers were prioritized for vaccinations and there was a statewide indoor mask mandate in place, which meant masks in schools. So, when school ended and summer started, it appeared COVID was under control. Now, case numbers are as high as they were during last winter’s surge, and kids and school workers are coming back into those buildings. And while there’s been a lot of attention on angry parents who oppose mask mandates in schools, there are many who say they’re frustrated and that the numbers show masks are needed. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports.

Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

Schools throughout Ohio are dealing with outbreaks of COVID-19. Some have temporarily shut down.  Others have gone to remote learning until the situation gets under control. As Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports, how a school district can react is based on the plans they set forth this summer.

Ohio Channel

When the current lines were drawn for Ohio House and Senate and Congressional districts ten years ago, much of that work was done by a handful of Republican lawmakers behind closed doors. Since then, Ohioans have passed new rules for the redistricting process to make it more open and accountable. But there are, once again, questions about whether the bulk of the work is being done in secret.

Dan Konik

State health leaders are preparing to offer booster shots to Ohioans who are 8 months out from their last Pfizer or Moderna COVID dose. That leads to the question – will boosters be required every 8 months from here on out? Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports. 

Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

School choice has been an option in many urban school districts throughout Ohio. But it hasn’t been as popular in rural and wealthy suburban districts. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports one school choice supporter says that might be changing because of the pandemic.

Ohio Congressman Tim Ryan (D-Ohio) will have a challenger in the Democratic primary for the U.S. Senate next May. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports.

Andry Popov / Shutterstock

Attempts to change Ohio law to require employers to pay women and men equally have been unsuccessful. Those bills have been mostly supported by Democrats who, for the past two decades, have been in the minority. Now there’s a new effort underway, and as Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports, lawmakers are taking a different approach.

Jo Ingles

Ohio’s Attorney General fears the state might not be able to get the $808 million it had hoped from the proposed $26 billion national settlement with three opioid distributors. 

Jo Ingles

Most of the state’s major hospitals are requiring their staff to get COVID vaccines. And while that’s been met by pushback from some staffers, it’s welcomed by most others. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports.

Ohio Department of Education

The deputy superintendent at the Ohio Department of Education was expected to take over the reins on an interim basis when current Superintendent Paolo DeMaria retires in late September. But now, that deputy superintendent has resigned. And as Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports, educators are watching carefully to see what happens.

Shutterstock

Tax-free back-to-school shopping returns this weekend.

Dan Konik

The Ohio Department of Health’s latest COVID guidance for K-12 schools strongly recommends those who can be vaccinated get shots, and masks for those who can’t or choose not to. But it doesn’t mandate masks for all, like some individual schools are doing. 

Jo Ingles

Pediatricians are warning the new contagious Delta variant is putting kids under 12, who cannot be vaccinated right now, at greater risk of contracting COVID. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles has details.

Jo Ingles

Ohio’s COVID-19 rates are on an upward trend, and less than half of the state’s residents have been vaccinated. Still, some lawmakers want to make sure Ohioans who don’t want to get vaccinated or don’t want to wear masks won’t feel compelled to do so. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports on the latest bill to keep schools and businesses from requiring masks for entry.   

Jo Ingles

A bill that would require abortion clinics to give women information about how to possibly reverse medication-induced procedures died in the last General Assembly. But it’s been brought back for another shot at passage. 

Dan Konik

Ohio’s top elections official has asked the state’s attorney general to investigate 117 people who either registered to vote in Ohio or actually cast a ballot in the 2020 election. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports that’s way down from previous elections.

MIKE CURTIN AND KAREN KASLER

Ohio’s top legislative leaders are being sued for not being transparent with the public in matters related to the state’s new voter-approved process for drawing new maps for Congress and the state House and Senate. 

Jo Ingles

Late last month, Ohio ended the extra $300 unemployment benefit that had been coming from the federal government, saying it would encourage Ohioans to get back to work quicker. Advocates for unemployed and low-income Ohioans disagree, saying that decision is shortsighted and hurts families. 

Jo Ingles

Tuesday July 6th is the last day for voters to register to cast ballots in next month’s special election for two Congressional seats. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports.   

Dan Konik

Gov. Mike DeWine says he’s still weighing his options on what to do with a bill that includes a provision that bans public schools and colleges from requiring employees and students get COVID vaccines. DeWine has been a strong supporter of COVID vaccines, but has always said he won’t mandate them. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports.

Dan Konik

Hours after signing Ohio’s new two-year budget into law, Gov. Mike DeWine took questions from reporters about his 14 vetoes – and about one measure he didn't strike out. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports.

Dan Konik

Now that Ohio lawmakers have passed a bill that prevents public schools and colleges from mandating students and employees get COVID vaccines, the attention turns to Gov. Mike DeWine. Will he sign it? Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports.

Dan Konik

After a bill that would allow college athletes in Ohio to profit from their name, image or likeness became ensnared in Statehouse politics last week, Gov. Mike DeWine has taken the issue in his own hands. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles says he’s signed an executive order that would do the same thing.

Karen Kasler

Ohio’s unemployment rate is 5%, just slightly higher than it was before the double-digit spike from the pandemic last year.

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