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Sharon Pruitt-Young

Texas outlawed abortions past the six-week mark in a law that went into effect on Sept. 1. Dr. Alan Braid, a Texas physician, says he performed one anyway just a few days later.

Three tourists were arrested after allegedly assaulting a restaurant host in Manhattan after she asked for proof of their vaccination status before they could be seated.

Humans aren't the only ones who have to worry about COVID-19. A number of lions and tigers at the Smithsonian's National Zoo in Washington, D.C., are now being treated for the virus.

Six African lions, a Sumatran tiger and two Amur tigers have tested presumptive positive for the virus that causes COVID-19 and are undergoing treatment, the zoo said in a news release Thursday.

RuPaul has a new accomplishment to add to his resume: having a (fabulous) insect named after him.

How are young people coping with climate change? The answer, according to one study, is not well, and for good reason.

For a forthcoming study, researchers with the U.K.'s University of Bath and other schools spoke to 10,000 people in 10 countries, all of whom were between the ages of 16 and 25, to gauge how they feel about climate change. The prevailing response could be summed up in two words: incredibly worried. And the respondents say governments aren't doing enough to combat climate change.

Emma Raducanu's career is on the upswing.

At only 18 years old, she accomplished a feat on Saturday that very few could have predicted, winning the U.S. Open title. Representing the United Kingdom, Raducanu bested 19-year-old Canadian Leylah Fernandez for the win with a final score of 6-4, 6-3, in a final that was already an anomaly as the first time it's been exclusively teens squaring off in the final in more than 20 years.

Through fires and hurricanes, through lethal heat waves and flash floods, the world seems to be ending — or at least, that's what it feels like.

President Biden and the Transportation Security Administration are cracking down on those who defy mask mandates on airplanes with one simple message: "If you break the rules, be prepared to pay."

"I shouldn't have waited."

In the final video posted on her TikTok account, Megan Alexandra Blankenbiller pleaded with her followers not to make the same mistake she did — waiting to get the COVID-19 vaccine — that eventually cost her her life.

Would you pay millions of dollars for a partly-destroyed work of art? What if it were a Banksy piece?

Activists on TikTok are fighting back against Texas' new restrictive abortion law with spam.

Sean Black, who goes by @black_madness21 on TikTok, created a bot that makes it easy to submit fake tips to a "whistleblower" website created by the anti-abortion Texas Right to Life group.

Health officials in Illinois have linked nearly 200 COVID-19 cases to two events — a church camp for teens and a men's conference — and the number of people who may have been exposed may be much greater and from multiple states.

It's a good week to be director Nia DaCosta. Not only did her new film, horror flick Candyman, have a spectacular opening weekend, she made history in the process, becoming the first Black female director to debut at No. 1 at the U.S. box office.

It's getting dangerously close to "game over" for some players in China: If you're under 18 and a fan of video games, you're now limited to just three hours of play a week.

In an effort to curb video game addiction among children, China's National Press and Publication Administration is tightening the reins on just how much that online gaming companies are allowed to offer young users, the nation's news agency Xinhua reported Monday.

If the intention of the attacks at the Kabul airport was to throw into disarray an already chaotic U.S. evacuation from Afghanistan, the effects of Thursday's violence are only beginning to take shape. Flights have been taking off from the airport since the explosions occurred, and President Biden said the American withdrawal will continue.

"America will not be intimidated," Biden said.

Women's Equality Day is all about celebrating equal rights, but it's important to note that when women first won the right to vote more than a century ago, equal rights weren't so equal.

The basics of Women's Equality Day are easy enough to understand: we celebrate it because on August 26, 1920, the 19th Amendment was certified, making it illegal to deny citizens the right to vote based on sex.

Here's what you might not know: the blanket use of the word "women" when discussing what the 19th Amendment changed is misleading.

Nearly 50 years after the arrest of a member of the Black Panther Party for the killing of a New Jersey state trooper, activists and even some law enforcement groups are ramping up the fight for his release.

Sundiata Acoli, now 84, was arrested in 1973 and later convicted in the death of State Trooper Werner Foerster.

In homes, churches and in braiding shops around Nashville, Brittany Starks and a team of dedicated volunteers are helping parents lighten their load, one braid at a time.

Starks' idea was a simple one: offer to braid children's hair for free in order to take away some of the stress for parents at the beginning of the school year. As anyone who's ever gotten their hair braided can tell you, it's an amazing deal: typically, getting your hair braided can cost hundreds of dollars and involve spending around five to six hours at a braiding salon, if not longer.

Officials have already fined unruly airline passengers upward of $1 million in civil penalties this year, and many of those citations are related to aggressive refusal to wear masks as required by federal rules.

Last year's COVID-19 lockdown disrupted the idea of school as we know it and it forced educators to think outside of the box. For one elementary school principal in North Carolina, thinking outside of the box had him heading outside — literally.

Jeff Bezos' ongoing rivalry with SpaceX is heating up. His aerospace company, Blue Origin, has filed a lawsuit against NASA after the agency awarded a highly coveted contract for a lunar lander to Elon Musk's SpaceX instead.

Blue Origin's federal suit accuses NASA of having been "unlawful and improper" in its evaluation of proposals concerning its human landing system program, SpaceNews reported.

It's time to check your freezer: A nationwide recall of frozen shrimp has been expanded due to salmonella risks.

A nurse in northern Germany is suspected of having duped thousands of people into receiving a shot of saline rather than a COVID-19 vaccine.

Dominion Voting Systems has filed billion-dollar lawsuits against two conservative television networks for their alleged spread of misinformation during the 2020 election, the company's latest move in an ongoing legal battle.

Smoke from wildfires raging in Russia has reached the North Pole for the first time in recorded history.

An employee in New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo's office has come forward publicly to allege that the governor sexually harassed her multiple times.

Canadian soccer player Quinn has just made Olympic history.

Updated July 23, 2021 at 6:53 PM ET

Cleveland's Major League Baseball team has changed its name to the Guardians, ridding itself of a previous name that many found highly offensive.

The team announced the name change Friday morning on Twitter, posting a two-minute video narrated by actor Tom Hanks.

It's 2021, but the policing of female athletes' bodies is a practice that continues to thrive.

Shein may have the fast-fashion market cornered, but a growing number of its customers are calling for increased accountability from the company as indie designers continue to accuse it of ripping off their work.

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