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Bump Stocks

A divided state Supreme Court has accepted an appeal by Ohio's capital city fighting to keep its ban on bump stocks, which allow semi-automatic weapons to fire rapidly.

The City of Columbus is asking the Ohio Supreme Court to rule individuals have no right to sue the city to overturn gun restrictions. 

The CEOs of 145 companies issued a new call for gun safety Thursday, sending a letter to members of the Senate on Thursday stating that it is "simply unacceptable" to do nothing about gun violence and mass shootings in the U.S.

Saying the country is in a public health crisis, the CEOs say new laws that would require background checks on all gun sales "are a common-sense solution with overwhelming public support and are a critical step toward stemming the gun violence epidemic in this country."

President Trump went before cameras on Monday in highly anticipated remarks following the mass shootings in Ohio and Texas over the weekend. In his remarks at the White House, Trump used the words "domestic terrorism" and "white supremacy." He did not acknowledge his own rhetoric.

The president targeted violent video games and drew a connection between mass shootings and mental health, though the research does not back up his assertions.

The 10th Ohio District Court of Appeals says two pro-gun groups who sued to try and block Columbus' bump stock ban have no standing to do so. 

gcftz.com

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley says his city is joining Columbus in taking the state to court over a recently-passed gun law.  

Updated at 2:55 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court officially denied an appeal from gun rights advocates seeking to stop a Trump administration ban on bump stocks, the gun add-ons that can dramatically increase their rate of fire. The ban went into effect on Tuesday.

Ohio Public Radio

The president of the Ohio Senate doesn't think lawmakers infringed on cities' rights with legislation that supersedes local gun ordinances and gives citizens the right to challenge those laws in court. 

Foley

The city of Columbus today filed a lawsuit against the state of Ohio to halt legislation enacted last year because it limits the ability municipalities have to enact local gun ordinances. 

There's a countdown clock on the website for RW Arms, a Texas-based seller of firearms accessories. It tracks the days, hours, minutes and seconds until they're no longer permitted to sell bump stocks, devices that allow semi-automatic rifles to fire almost as fast as illegal machine guns.

Promotional emails from RW Arms also include the countdown clock, urging customers to "order now" to "enjoy this unique firing experience" while they can.

The Trump administration is banning bump stocks, the firearm attachment that allows a semiautomatic weapon to shoot almost as fast as a machine gun.

The devices, also known as slide fires, came under intense scrutiny after they were used by the gunman who opened fire on a country music concert in Las Vegas last year, killing 58 people.

The massacre touched off a public outcry, including from some lawmakers, for the accessories to be banned.

Statehouse News Bureau

Ohio Governor John Kasich is using an unusual procedure that will allow a gun bill to become law without his signature. 

A Hamilton County judge has issued a temporary restraining order blocking the City of Cincinnati from enforcing it's two-month-old ban on bump stocks. 

A Franklin County judge says the City of Columbus' recently enacted ban on bump stocks is unconstitutional. 

A Franklin County judge Monday extended the temporary restraining order issued last month halting enforcement of the City of Columbus' new gun regulations. 

WCBE files

A Franklin County judge has granted a temporary restraining order barring the city of Columbus from enforcing its recently enacted gun regulations, including a ban on bump stocks, amid a lawsuit filed by pro-gun groups. 

WCBE files

Two pro gun groups are making good on their threats to take legal action against the cities of Columbus and Cincinnati over recently passed weapons laws. 

Columbus City Council last night approved a series of new gun restrictions, including bans on imitation firearms and bump stocks. 

Two gun rights groups are threatening to sue the city of Cincinnati after city council Wednesday passed an ordinance banning so-called "trigger activators" like bump stocks, modifications that allow rapid fire.  

WCBE files

Only eight people showed up to speak last night at a Columbus City Council hearing on proposed gun regulations. 

buckeyefirearms.org

A pro-gun group says it is prepared to sue the City of Columbus if the group determines proposed gun control laws violate state law. 

Jo Ingles

An estimated 200 Ohio high school students who walked out of their buildings this morning made their way to the Statehouse to lobby  lawmakers to pass or reject some gun bills under consideration.

The Justice Department has taken the first step in banning the sale, manufacture or possession of bump stocks through new regulation, as Congress stalls in drafting a legislative prohibition.

ohiosenate.gov

Among Republican Ohio Governor John Kasich’s new proposals on gun laws are a ban on bump stocks” and a so-called “red flag” bill, allowing law enforcement to seize guns of people deemed dangerous. 

Ohio Public Radio

Ohio Governor John Kasich proposed several gun law changes he hopes to get through the Republican-dominated  legislature.

nbcnews.com

Republican U.S. Senator Rob Portman of Ohio told reporters during a conference call Tuesday this might be the time for lawmakers to ban the use of bump stocks.

Updated at 5:50 p.m. ET

Following the deadly school shooting in Florida on Feb. 14, President Trump is directing the Department of Justice to develop regulations to ban bump stocks.

"Just a few moments ago I signed a memorandum directing the AG to propose regulations to ban all devices that turn legal weapons into machine guns. I expect that these critical regulations will be finalized, Jeff, very soon," Trump said, referring to Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

One of America's leading and most controversial gun-accessory makers says it will resume sales Tuesday of a device known as a "bump stock."

Bump stocks dramatically accelerate the rate-of-fire of semi-automatic rifles, allowing them to shoot almost as fast as fully-automatic machine guns, which are far more tightly regulated and expensive in the U.S.

Ohio gun groups say they oppose any bans on the bump stocks used by the Las Vegas mass shooter to turn semi-automatic rifles into rapid-fire automatic weapons.

Ohio Public Radio

The White House has chided talk of gun control this week, claiming it's too soon to discuss policy in the wake of the Las Vegas shootings.