Listen

Hannah Hagemann

Hannah Hagemann is a 2019 Kroc Fellow. During her fellowship, she will work at NPR's National Desk and Weekend Edition.

She comes to NPR from the Bay Area, where she earned a master's in science journalism from UC Santa Cruz and reported for KQED Public Radio in San Francisco.

In July 2019, Hannah was one of the first reporters on the ground covering the mass shooting in Gilroy, California. Hagemann enjoys reporting stories at the intersection of community, policy and science. She has reported on climate change, fishing issues and PFAS chemicals.

Before beginning a career in journalism, Hagemann worked as a geologist. She sampled and cleaned up industrial pollution across California with drill crews, railroad foremen and high-level regulators. The work brought Hagemann to remote corners of the Mojave and sprawling air force bases, but most often she was investigating contamination in working-class communities across Los Angeles.

In her free time, Hagemann enjoys hiking, skiing, mountain biking and seeing live bluegrass and funk music. She also paints landscapes and writes poetry.

New York is "decidedly in the reopening phase," Gov. Andrew Cuomo said on Sunday, as the state hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic gave sports leagues, campgrounds and veterinarian offices the green light to start up again, with modifications.

Professional sports leagues in the state are now able to begin training camps, Cuomo said during his daily press conference, adding that having teams come back, even without spectators, would mark a "return to normalcy."

In March, as states across the country began implementing stay-at-home orders and commuters got off the road, traffic dropped, but a new National Safety Council report finds that the number of motor vehicle fatalities per miles driven increased by 14% compared with the March 2019 rate.

Congressional Democrats announced Saturday they're requesting all records and documents regarding President Trump's decision to fire State Department Inspector General Steve Linick, the fourth government watchdog Trump has fired or sought to remove in the last six weeks.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a set of documents on Thursday designed to provide guidance on how child care centers, schools, restaurants and bars, and other establishments could begin the process of reopening in the face of the coron

Updated at 11:16 p.m. ET

The Food and Drug Administration is cautioning the public about the reliability of a widely used rapid test for the coronavirus. The test, made by Abbott Laboratories, has been linked with inaccurate results that could falsely reassure patients that they are not infected with the virus.

The Trump administration has promoted the test as a key factor in controlling the epidemic in the U.S., and it's used for daily testing at the White House.

Eighteen of California's 58 counties have received state approval to further ease coronavirus restrictions, but major population centers such as the San Francisco Bay Area are choosing not to relax stay-at-home orders for now.

Major League Baseball owners will submit a proposal to the players' union to start its 2020 season in July without fans.

If the proposal is approved by the baseball players' union, Opening Day would take place around July 4 weekend and spring training would start in early to mid-June.

Teams would play around 82 games in the regular season compared to the standard 162 games and would only play opponents in their own division or teams in the same geographic area. The proposal would also expand the playoff pool from 10 to 14 by adding a wild card match-up in each league.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson outlined plans Sunday for a phased reopening of Britain's economy, citing decreasing coronavirus hospitalizations and deaths, and asked anyone who cannot perform their jobs from home, such as construction and factory workers, to return to work.

"There are millions of people who are both fearful of this terrible disease, and at the same time also fearful of what this long period of enforced inactivity will do to their livelihoods and their mental and physical well-being," Johnson said. "To their futures and the futures of their children."

The worst of the nation's historic job losses are yet to come, according to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who told Fox News Sunday that "the reported numbers are probably going to get worse before they get better."

Over 32,000 people have died from the new coronavirus in the United Kingdom, according to the Office for National Statistics, marking the first time in the pandemic that it has led Europe in the number of deaths.

The country has surpassed Italy in COVID-19 deaths. The U.S. still leads the world in the highest number of coronavirus deaths; over 70,270 had died from the disease as of Tuesday.

Gov. Gavin Newsom announced that California will allow some retail businesses to reopen with modifications as early as Friday, amid encouraging coronavirus benchmarks.

"We are entering into the next phase this week," Newsom said in his daily press briefing Monday. "This is a very positive sign and it's happened only for one reason: The data says it can happen."

The businesses will include places such as book, clothing, toy and sporting goods stores, as well as music shops and florists, the governor said.

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson opened up about his nearly two-week-long battle with coronavirus on Sunday, revealing that at points during his ICU stay doctors were making arrangements for "what to do if things went badly wrong."

"It was a tough old moment, I won't deny it," the 55-year-old said in an interview with British newspaper The Sun. "They had a strategy to deal with a 'death of Stalin-type' scenario."

Johnson spent three nights in the ICU at St Thomas' Hospital in London, where he said medical workers gave him "liters and liters of oxygen."

California Gov. Gavin Newsom ordered all beaches and state parks in Orange County to temporarily close on Thursday, after images in the news showed crowds gathering on beaches there and, according to Newsom, violating the state's physical distancing rules.

Coronavirus antibody tests have garnered attention from officials as a potential tool to evaluate people's immunity to the illness. But the majority of companies creating the tests have had little to no regulatory oversight, according to the chair of the House Subcommittee on Economic and Consumer Policy.

The Boston Red Sox's illegal sign stealing during their 2018 championship season has cost them their second-round draft pick this year, a decision announced by Major League Baseball Wednesday.

An MLB report concludes that J.T. Watkins, the team's video replay operator, was the major culprit in the 2018 scandal, but the wrongdoing happened only in limited circumstances.

A federal judge in California on Monday ordered U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to "identify and track" every person in ICE detention at an elevated risk of complications from COVID-19 and to consider releasing those detainees, regardless of their legal status.

Risk factors identified by the court include pregnant women, people older than 55 and those with chronic health conditions.

Almost three months after LA basketball icon Kobe Bryant, his daughter Gianna and seven others were killed in a helicopter crash, family members of four people who died in the crash are suing to hold the helicopter's owners liable in the deaths.

The two lawsuits, filed electronically on Sunday in Los Angeles Superior Court, allege that Island Express Helicopter, Inc., and its owner Island Express Holding Corp., were negligent and careless, behavior that was a "substantial factor" in the crash.

Updated at 6:56 p.m. ET

As of Sunday, nearly three months since the first confirmed case of the coronavirus was reported in the United States, there are over 746,300 confirmed cases of the virus in the country, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

A Pew Research Center survey conducted this month among 4,917 U.S. adults found that 27% of black people personally knew someone who was hospitalized with or died from COVID-19, compared to just 1 in 10 white and Hispanic people.

The results highlight how coronavirus is disproportionately affecting lower-income people of color.

In the last decade, bans and taxes on single-use plastic bags have been enacted in a number of states including California, Hawaii and Massachusetts and cities such as New York and Washington, D.C., as shoppers switched to reusable bags.

Now, some major grocery chains are not allowing shoppers to bring reused bags and lawmakers in a number of jurisdictions are rescinding the bans temporarily, citing health concerns prompted by the the coronavirus pandemic.

Citing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendation that all Americans wear face coverings in public, starting Tuesday Starbucks will require all employees to wear one at work.

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

The Ruby Princess cruise ship docked in Sydney on March 19 and nearly 2,700 passengers who were on board left freely, though some exhibited flu-like symptoms. On Sunday, Australian police announced they've launched a criminal investigation into the Ruby Princess, citing questions over whether the operators of the ship, Carnival Australia, were transparent about sickened passengers and crew members.

Pope Francis was the sole celebrant at Palm Sunday Mass in St. Peter's Basilica at the commencement of Holy Week, and the service took place without a congregation, which the Vatican press office said was a historic first for the Roman Catholic Church.

Updated at 11:11 p.m. ET

A New Jersey Army National Guardsman who had tested positive for the coronavirus and been hospitalized since March 21, died Saturday, according to the Department of Defense.

The service member was identified by Gen. Joseph Lengyel, head of the National Guard Bureau, as Army Capt. Douglas Linn Hickok, a physician assistant who served in the U.S. Army Medical Command.

The death marks the first service member to have died from the coronavirus.

In recent weeks doctors and nurses have reported dire shortages of protective gear; on the Cape Cod peninsula in Massachusetts, and in the San Francisco Bay Area, hospital workers say they're being forced to reuse N-95 masks. In New York, the current epicenter of the U.S.

Eli Bundy, a 15-year-old sophomore at Charleston County School of the Arts in South Carolina, knows how it feels to be ignored in the classroom. In South Carolina, it's illegal for teachers to address queer relationships, unless they're talking about sexually transmitted infections, also called STIs.

Eli, who identifies as queer, says they and their classmates have broached the subject of non-heterosexual relationships in health classes, but that their questions go unanswered.

Lore had it that the SS Cotopaxi was swallowed by the infamous Bermuda Triangle after the steamship, and all 32 crew members on board, inexplicably vanished in 1925.

In the sci-fi film Close Encounters of the Third Kind, aliens are responsible for the ship's disappearance.

But a team of divers has identified the ship and debunked the fictions, theories and conspiracies that emerged over the years. And unlike in Close Encounters, the ship wasn't found in the Gobi desert, but rather 35 miles off St. Augustine in Florida.

Hemp farming exploded after the 2018 Farm Bill passed last December. The bill decriminalized the plant at the federal level, opening the door for many U.S. farmers to grow and sell hemp.

Over the past year, licensed hemp acreage increased more than 445%, according to the advocacy and research group Vote Hemp. More than 510,000 acres of hemp were licensed in 2019, versus about 112,000 acres in 2018.

Updated at 8:06 p.m. ET

The electric car industry is expanding, and at least one business owner is capitalizing on that growth. RS Automotive — the first U.S. gas station fully converted to an electric vehicle-charging station — opened a month ago in Takoma Park, Md.

A brand new blue and white sign reads EV charging, replacing where the dollar and cents gas price listings stood. From afar, the station's electric chargers don't look too different from their predecessors. Some drivers still think they can still fill up their gas tanks here.