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Prognosis Ohio:Scooters, Ubers, and Automobiles: Sustainable Transportation with Prof. Harvey Miller

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On the latest episode of Prognosis Ohio, about sustainable transportation in Ohio, Dan Skinner talks with Professor Harvey Miller, Reusche Chair in Geographic Information Science, and Director of the Center for Urban and Regional Analysis. Topics include walking and accessibility, micromobility, challenges in dislodging overdependence on cars, ride hailing apps, and what Ohio stands to gain from the infrastructure bill recently enacted by the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Biden.

You can learn more about Prof Miller’s work by following some of the links on his website, and follow him on Twitter here.

Check out this piece about work Harvey and his colleagues did on the idea of “essential workers” during the early months of the pandemic. Dan and Harvey briefly discuss this work on the show. If you’re unfamiliar with the COTA system, you should really acquaint yourself here. And also, Dan—who loves bike riding, but needs a new one—really regrets not asking Harvey more about biking in Central Ohio. You can check out a great biking map made by the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission here. More generally, as background, this Axios piece provides a nice over overview of what the infrastructure bill means for Ohio.

This episode was hosted and produced by Dan Skinner. Music by Kyle Rosenberger.

Dr. Dan Skinner is Associate Professor of Health Policy in the Department of Social Medicine at Ohio University, Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, on the Dublin, Ohio campus. He earned his Ph.D. in political science from the City University of New York. Skinner teaches and researches about, as well as advocates for increased access to health care, especially for underserved populations, as well as various aspects of social determinants that affect the health of communities, in Ohio and beyond.
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