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Federal Judge Prohibits State From Enforcing Planned Parenthood Funding Law

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Ohio Public Radio
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The state plans to appeal Friday's order from a federal district judge that blocks a state law intended to divert public money from Planned Parenthood. Organization officials are applauding the decision. Cecile Richards, the national head of Planned Parenthood, says momentum is on its side. She calls it a win for Ohioans who rely on Planned Parenthood for necessary health services. Anti-Abortion groups are criticizing the ruling, calling the judge an activist. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles has  details.

Federal judge Michael Barrett has banned the new mostly Republican backed law. It sought to take more than one million federal dollars for things like H-I-V tests, cancer screenings and other prevention services from Planned Parenthood. The law had been put on hold last May. Katie Franklin with Ohio Right to Life, which supported the new law, is not happy about the decision.

 

“Yet again, we are looking at an activist judge who is fabricating rights out of thin air for the benefit of the abortion industry.”

 

Franklin says the new law should be enforced because it represents the will of taxpayers.

 

“Well Judge Barrett’s decision is a clear violation of state rights and the conscious right of taxpayers. Planned Parenthood has no right to the hard earned dollars of taxpayers. Millions of them have an objection to Planned Parenthood’s pro-abortion business model.”

 

But Iris Harvey, the President of Planned Parenthood of Greater Ohio, is applauding the ruling.

 

“We’re overjoyed, obviously. It validates our stand that legislation was unconstitutional.”

 

The state is likely to appeal the decision. But Harvey says she isn’t focused on that.

 

“We’ll take one step at a time. I think right now it is business as usual. We will continue to provide great health care to the people of Ohio who come to Planned Parenthood everyday and need the services. That will be uninterrupted and that’s the most important thing at this time.”

 

Ohio is one of ten states where laws to take money away from Planned Parenthood have been overturned in court.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Statehouse News Bureau was founded in 1980 to provide educational, comprehensive coverage of legislation, elections, issues and other activities surrounding the Statehouse to Ohio's public radio and television stations. To this day, the Bureau remains the only broadcast outlet dedicated to in-depth coverage of state government news and topics of statewide interest. The Bureau is funded througheTech Ohio, and is managed by ideastream. The reporters at the Bureau follow the concerns of the citizens and voters of Ohio, as well as the actions of the Governor, the Ohio General Assembly, the Ohio Supreme Court, and other elected officials. We strive to cover statehouse news, government issues, Ohio politics, and concerns of business, culture and the arts with balance and fairness, and work to present diverse voices and points of view from the Statehouse and throughout Ohio. The three award-winning journalists at the bureau have more than 60 combined years of radio and television experience. They can be heard on National Public Radio and are regular contributors to Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Marketplace. Every weekday, the Statehouse News Bureau produces in-depth news reports forOhio's public radio stations. Those stories are also available on this website, either on the front page or in our archives. Weekly, the Statehouse News Bureau produces a television show from our studios in the Statehouse. The State of Ohio is an unique blend of news, interviews, talk and analysis, and is broadcast on Ohio's public television stations. The Statehouse News Bureau also produces special programming throughout the year, including the Governor's annual State of the State address to the Ohio General Assembly and a five-part year-end review.
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