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Tom Goldman

Tom Goldman is NPR's sports correspondent. His reports can be heard throughout NPR's news programming, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and on NPR.org.

With a beat covering the entire world of professional sports, both in and outside of the United States, Goldman reporting covers the broad spectrum of athletics from the people to the business of athletics.

During his nearly 30 years with NPR, Goldman has covered every major athletic competition including the Super Bowl, the World Series, the NBA Finals, golf and tennis championships, and the Olympic Games.

His pieces are diverse and include both perspective and context. Goldman often explores people's motivations for doing what they do, whether it's solo sailing around the world or pursuing a gold medal. In his reporting, Goldman searches for the stories about the inspirational and relatable amateur and professional athletes.

Goldman contributed to NPR's 2009 Edward R. Murrow award for his coverage of the 2008 Beijing Olympics and to a 2010 Murrow Award for contribution to a series on high school football, "Friday Night Lives." Earlier in his career, Goldman's piece about Native American basketball players earned a 2004 Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award from the Center for the Study of Sport in Society at Northeastern University and a 2004 Unity Award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association.

In January 1990, Goldman came to NPR to work as an associate producer for sports with Morning Edition. For the next seven years he reported, edited, and produced stories and programs. In June 1997, he became NPR's first full-time sports correspondent.

For five years before NPR, Goldman worked as a news reporter and then news director in local public radio. In 1984, he spent a year living on an Israeli kibbutz. Two years prior he took his first professional job in radio in Anchorage, Alaska, at the Alaska Public Radio Network.

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How nice it is to find time for sports.

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Finally, time for sports.

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Fans of the World Cup champion U.S. women's national soccer team are getting what they want.

More.

The team began a victory tour last weekend. It runs until October.

It's a heady time for women's soccer. But other women's sports want to take advantage of the moment as well. And they're hoping to overcome cultural obstacles that traditionally have made their sports less relevant.

Powerful potential

It's been a month since the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team won a second straight World Cup, and gained rock star popularity in the process.

Since the win, the goal has been to capitalize on that success.

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And now it's time for sports.

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No matter what else is happening in the world, it's time for sports.

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SIMON: A new name on top at Wimbledon and lots of new jerseys on a lot of NBA free agents. NPR's Tom Goldman joins us.

Good morning, Tom.

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I wait all week to say, it's time for sports.

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SIMON: International women's football - the Women's World Cup now happening in France. NPR's Tom Goldman joins us. Good morning, Tom.

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The famed horse racing track, Santa Anita Park, is up and running after being closed for much of last month following a spike in racehorse deaths. Since the end of December 2018, 23 thoroughbreds have died — mostly due to injuries from racing or training. The fatalities have forced the horse racing industry, and the public, to take a hard look at the sport and some of the issues that have been debated for years: Are the economics of horse racing taking priority over the animals' health and welfare? Should racehorses be medicated and, if so, how much?

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Going to take a deep breath because it's time for sports.

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And it's time now for sports.

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And now a sober, contemplative look at sports.

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Bernice Sandler, the "godmother of Title IX" who died Saturday at the age of 90, is being remembered this week for her lifelong fight to reverse decades of institutional bias in U.S. schools and open new paths for women and girls.

It all started in an elementary school in Brooklyn, N.Y., when Sandler was a determined little girl nicknamed Bunny. She was offended by the way the boys got to do all the classroom activities.

"For example, running a slide projector," says Marty Langelan, who was Sandler's friend and colleague for nearly 50 years.

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Now, time for sports.

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And now a couple of chestnuts roasting on an open fire (laughter) or, as we say around here, time for sports.

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And no matter what else happens in the world, time for sports.

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And it's time for sports.

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A Milwaukee relief pitcher takes a baseball bat to the Dodgers. And tonight, can the Bosox topple last year's champions? NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman joins us. Tom, thanks so much for being with us.

Flat track is the oldest form of motorcycle racing in the U.S., on dirt tracks, stretching back to the early 1900s. The sport, rooted in the country's heartland, is now showing signs of broader appeal, even in America's crowded sports landscape.

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Finally, time for sports.

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The new NFL season is upon us, but the league can't shake some unfinished business. And the Williams sisters hit the hard courts of the U.S. Open. Hard-headed analysis already from Tom Goldman. Tom, thanks so much for being with us.

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And it's time for sports.

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SIMON: The NFL is back - well, preseason anyway - and has some rule changes. NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman gets our head in the game. Tom, thanks very much for being with us.

It's been well-documented in recent years that minor league baseball players don't exactly share in the riches of the game. Most minor leaguers make an estimated $7,500 for a year. Major league players average more than $4 million.

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CTE has been part of the national lexicon in the U.S. since the 2015 movie Concussion dramatized the discovery of this degenerative brain disease among football players.

American tennis player Serena Williams will play in the Wimbledon Ladies singles final for the tenth time on Saturday. She is favored against Germany's Angelique Kerber to win her eighth Wimbledon singles title. And Williams has lost only one set in her six matches so far.

"There's a sense we've seen this movie before," says Sports Illustrated Executive Editor Jon Wertheim.

Croatia has advanced to its first-ever World Cup final in men's soccer. The Croatian National team came from behind and upset favored England 2-to-1 in a semifinal match decided in extra time on Wednesday in Moscow.

Croatia was supposed to be a tired team coming into the match.

Its previous two games went to extra time and then emotionally draining penalty shootouts. But if anything, the grueling lead-up to the clash against England solidified Croatia's mental toughness, which served the Croats well on Wednesday.

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And it's time now for sports.

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At the World Cup in Russia, it finally happened.

It took a record 37 matches, but Tuesday at Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow, Denmark and France played to a scoreless tie. Or if you want to sound like someone who knows futbol, a nil-nil draw.

It was the tournament's first. According to FIFA, international soccer's governing body, the 36 matches that preceded Tuesday's double goose eggs "smashed" the previous record, when it took 26 matches at a World Cup to finally get to a scoreless tie.

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And now time for sports.

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