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Good Health Is About More Than Medicine

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Good health really is about so much more than medicine. Even communities with state-of-the-art hospital systems and the latest in medical technology may struggle to improve the overall health of their nearby populations. That’s because other factors are at work in determining health care outcomes.

According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, these all-important “social determinants of health” are the underlying conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age. Social determinants of health include factors like socioeconomic status, education, neighborhood and physical environment, employment, and social support networks, as well as access to health care. Even a person’s zip code can determine their likelihood for good health and longevity.

Social determinants of health can mean that even the best medical technology may struggle to improve the longevity and healthcare outcomes of vulnerable populations.

Communities that are successfully improving healthcare outcomes, including Columbus, are recognizing the critical connection between better healthcare outcomes and workforce development, improved environmental conditions, sanitation, and consistent access to healthy food.

With COVID-19’s many barriers to better health, community agencies working to improve healthcare outcomes have had to shift and modify their day-to-day operations in reaction to the pandemic. Successful communities have capitalized on telehealth and getting modern technology, such as continuous glucose monitoring devices, to consumers who need them.

What challenges have Columbus agencies and providers faced and overcome during the pandemic to continue to improve the healthcare outcomes of our most vulnerable neighbors? Join CMC as we explore what social determinants of health are, and the significant role being played in the COVID-era by key medical and service providers to make Columbus healthier, close the healthcare gaps between populations, and bring the “Columbus Way” of partnership synergies to bear on improving healthcare outcomes.

Featuring Jesse Reed, Director, CareSource-Life Services Ohio, Amy Headings, Ph.D., Director of Research and Nutrition, Mid-Ohio Food Collective, Perry Gregory, Senior Vice President, National Center for Urban Solutions, and Mike Premo, Director of Engagement, Community Development for All People, with host Greg Moody, Director, Professional Development and State of Ohio Leadership Institute, The Ohio State University John Glenn College of Public Affairs.