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Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

Updated at 7:54 pm ET

One of the Trump administration's biggest environmental rollbacks suffered a stunning setback Wednesday, as a decades-long push to drill for oil in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge ended with a lease sale that attracted just three bidders — one of which was the state of Alaska itself.

Alaska's state-owned economic development corporation was the only bidder on nine of the parcels offered for lease in the northernmost swath of the refuge, known as the coastal plain. Two small companies also each picked up a single parcel.

Starting Tuesday, oil and gas companies can pick which parts of Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge they're interested in drilling. It's the latest push by the Trump administration to auction off development rights in the pristine landscape before President-elect Joe Biden takes office.

Updated 5:10 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is pushing ahead with plans to allow drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The first leases to drill for oil and gas in the area could be sold by the end of 2020, Interior Department Secretary David Bernhardt said as his agency formally announced its leasing program on Monday.

One year after Congress voted to allow oil development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, the Trump administration has taken another step towards making it happen.

The Interior Department Thursday announced it is releasing the draft environmental impact statement for an oil leasing program in the refuge's Coastal Plain.

"An energy-dominant America starts with an energy-dominant Alaska," said outgoing Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke in a statement.

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A provision in the new federal tax bill has many environmental advocates concerned. Ohio Public Radio's Andy Chow reports.